Comments about ‘Farmers and ranchers: Utah's environmental workforce’

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Published: Monday, April 22 2013 9:50 a.m. MDT

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procuradorfiscal
Tooele, UT

Re: "Farmers and ranchers are proven and committed environmental stewards . . . justifiably concerned about the regulatory overreach of the Environmental Protection Agency."

Hear, hear!

Utah is the premier tree-hugger target it is today, only because Utah's agriculture and mining families have been the premier stewards to the land they've been for 165+ years.

That stewardship is, sadly, being overruled and the environment damaged by absentee Washington landlords with little concern for or commitment to sustainability of our environment -- at least as concerns human beings [who they consider a noxious infestation] as part of the environment.

Ultra Bob
Cottonwood Heights, UT

Farmers and ranchers are businessmen. Their motives and goals are for the most profit from their efforts.

They are no different than the other businessmen who complain about the regulations protecting their customers.

Their propaganda overstates their patriotism, morality and value to our society. They are simply Americans, like the rest of us.

Hutterite
American Fork, UT

Farmers and ranchers are environmental stewards like they're safety conscious...it only works when there are a whole lot of exemptions not available to any other business. Or, as a cow calf operator once told me, as he was burying a bald eagle that had been bothering his calves, 'shoot, shovel and shut up'.

Baron Scarpia
Logan, UT

The 'Dust Bowl' of the 1930s provides an important lesson about farming practices and environmental stewardship. The practice of deep-plowing and stripping the land of natural grasses for crops and then letting them stand bare in the off-seasons resulted in the erosion of some of the earth's greatest top soil -- a product that had been created over millions of years. Drought and winds simply blew that resource away, bankrupting farmers and contributing to the 'Great Depression' -- demonstrating the value of environmental stewardship and economic sustainability. Without protecting their resources, farmers couldn't survive.

While farming practices have come a long way since then, new environmental challenges continue, from the use of pesticides and water to patented genetically-modified seeds that allow for weed control, but also place farmers and humanity at the mercy of paying for patents on seeds and foods from big agricultural concerns, such as Monsanto. Corn seeds, for example, are no longer a gift from God, but a patented-product own by corporations.

In sum, for farmers to be seen as stewards of the land and environment, they need to be proactive in addressing environmental and social concerns about the industry.

procuradorfiscal
Tooele, UT

Re: ". . . for farmers to be seen as stewards of the land and environment, they need to be proactive in addressing environmental and social concerns about the industry."

And, if you'd read the article, you'd know some of the ways farm and ranch families, along with their trade organizations, like the Farm Bureau, are doing exactly that.

the old switcharoo
mesa, AZ

I've found one of the tenets of dishonesty in local politics is to give awards and accolades to people for something they do the opposite of.

The most dishonest Judge I've ever heard of in Idaho received awards for honesty and fairness from one side of a water dispute. Cough.

So giving accolades to the farmers of Utah carte blanche without even a suggestion of something they could do better smells of self serving platitudes and public relations to me.

procuradorfiscal
Tooele, UT

Re: "I've found one of the tenets of dishonesty in local politics is to give awards and accolades to people for something they do the opposite of."

Yeah, and another is to disingenuously attack and demonize people who've done nothing wrong because they're in the way of one or another liberal political agenda item.

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