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Comments about ‘Colorado River deemed nation's most endangered river’

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Published: Tuesday, April 16 2013 10:00 p.m. MDT

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toosmartforyou
Farmington, UT

Just what would be accomplished if most of the water ran into the ocean? How does century old decision affect next years spring runoff, which hasn't happened yet? Aren't these just environmentalists screaming that the sky is falling?

JWB
Kaysville, UT

Climate change means what? Does that include warming and cooling? Haven't those happened since time in-memoriam? Green house gases are supposedly higher but for several years it has been getting colder? The people that come up with these theories are still theorizing but making lots of money making new kind of light bulbs, cars that run on electricity which still use energy, etc. What makes money is for people to change what they are doing so they can buy the next supposedly "green" item to keep the manufacturers in business, in China, that is. Vice-President Gore still buys his carbon footprint credits to fly his private jet around the world making speeches.

We need to worry about people. Cows still burp and other processes to generate gas that smells. People still eat meat, even though from Argentina and the southern hemisphere. Rains still come and cause floods and the snow runoffs still occur bringing water. There are droughts but those come and go, also.

The Colorado River tributaries still bring in water and flooding. San Diego and other California areas may not get all the water they were as they violated their Contract with Utah.

casual observer
Salt Lake City, UT

The Colorado River outlet into the Gulf of California is now a desert that has destroyed the delta. Environmentalists are screaming that the river is falling, not the sky. The Las Vegas answer is to put another access pipe into Lake Mead at a lower level. As Will Rogers noted about land, no one is making more water. We had best use our water more intelligently.

lket
Bluffdale, UT

these comments make me wonder if these people read this newspaper. last year was the warmest. not colder. this year is colder but not more water. las vegas wants more water and produces little return for the use of water no food is grown, the power plant on the green will slow the flow to the colorado. the river is drying from the end up how far up do we let it dry? also the nuc plant will create more national debt. they get funding from the government and private, but few have paid for themselves and then billions of clean up after they close because they all will be closed. they wear out. and before you label me listen to this water power in our cayons is always a possibility. so the rivers would have to have construction in them. sacrifices need to be made. yellowstone is a great steam power plant waitng to be tapped. utah is windy and we already pump water from wells with wind power a very cheap and old tech.

RedShirt
USS Enterprise, UT

To "toosmartforyou" unfortunately it is only those who oppose liberal doctrine that can say that the "the sky is falling". When liberals and their environmentalist conspirators say things like this, it is a matter of fact that must be accepted without question.

one old man
Ogden, UT

In the meantime, a proposal to extend a large volume pipeline from Lake Powell to St. George, Utah is still alive and rattling around somewhere. One Utah legislator was quoted as saying something like, "We can't let all the water that has been allocated to Utah get away from us."

Many years ago, I was told that on any given summer day, six inches of water per day is evaporated from the surfaces of both Lake Powell and Lake Mead (and the other lakes below Mead). Evaporation loss from Lake Powell alone was supposedly enough to quench the daily thirst of the Los Angeles basin. (I admit, I've never tried to verify that. But it sounds logical.) Down where what little is left of the Colorado as it crosses into Mexico, the water has become quite saline due to evaporation upstream. When I've visited Yuma, I've seen reports in local papers expressing concern that the increased salinity is harming crops down there.

When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe.
John Muir

lost in DC
West Jordan, UT

Just what is the veracity of the authors of the report? What is their agenda? Who are they? What authority do they have? Who funds them, and what is their funders' agenda?

Too much unknown about those who produced the report for me to get too excited about it.

Wixom
Bountiful, UT

Same old same old from activists. Pie in the sky proposals that are really just red herrings. Their agenda is to limit development and population growth. Let's use the Colorado and our other waters wisely, but let's use them. Someone else will if we don't.

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