Comments about ‘LDS World: Beware of 'walking in darkness at noon-day'’

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Published: Sunday, April 14 2013 5:00 a.m. MDT

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Firefly123
Mapleton, UT

Since it's come up here, and I've wondered but always forgotten to ask...Why is God the same yesterday, today and forever, but different from the vengeful God of the Old Testament?

Gracie
Boise, ID

He's not different. From shallow reading of the Old Testament comes the misconception of his personality. He had to build up a set-apart people who would follow him--and to protect them against their own insistence on bad choices--that is too often mistaken for a vengeful God. Love is the first and ultimate thing, and he invented it. When his people turned against him over and over, he had to have penalties that would teach them all that it was always better to be obedient than not. These willful Israelites were set amongst the most vengeful of neighboring countries that did their best to exterminate them. Following God to the max is what saved Israel, although they frequently chose to go it alone. It's much like Britain during WWII: they finally decided to do the smart things to win the war and eventually listened to Churchill about how to go about it. After the war, when they were again safe and secure, they quickly rejected sound principles. Today God is loving still, and he seems to often let us punish ourselves--probably because we refuse to listen to him anymore.

Aberlemno
San Antonio, TX

I was really touched by this article. It reminded me of my own struggles to understand God's will in my life. I can totally relate to the saints in Kirtland as they questioned the wisdom in building a temple at that time in their lives. I have been the one asking questions. I have been the one who could not fathom the way that God intended to bless me by asking me to follow him. Looking back now I am awed by the wisdom and majesty of the workings of God.

Craig Clark
Boulder, CO

When Franklin Roosevelt was stricken with polio, it took him a long time to come to terms with spending life in a wheel chair. But he kept fighting back. When he became President, it was his buoyant optimism that made him an inspirational leader that gave hope to a nation that was in the depths of despair.

How we deal with the blows life gives us can make all the difference. In the Catholic Church, they teach, ‘act as though you have faith and faith will be given you.’ Across all fiaths, there are countless stories of the power of faith.

estreetshuffle
Window Rock, AZ

I admire your comments; however, like to see anyone of you to go at it alone without any home teaching from fellow Mormons to help you along the way. When you have a church support system going it is easier but to totally be alone and try it--it is different. Try it sometime and see what you are really made of.

sixpacktr
Murfreesboro, TN

I think that while we tend to forget God when things are going good, I don't attribute the Saint's hesitation just to not trusting God. I think that at times we begin to doubt from which source the counsel came. At this time, perhaps they were not doubting God as much as wondering just what Brother Joseph was thinking, how HE could demand this of them. We like to preach the homily that a prophet is only a prophet when he speaks the word of God but just a man otherwise. Perhaps that was the root of their 'dragging their feet' a bit? I am reminded of a PH session address Pres Eyring gave several years ago about this very thing (discerning when a prophet speaks as a prophet). He spoke of saving the church lots of money because of his overhearing the prophet speaking with another GA about some holdings they had and his worry about the market failing. It wasn't a profound utterance, yet Pres Eyring acted upon that overheard conversation and saved the church a lot of money. In like manner, perhaps we just need to listen and not question so much?

Brahmabull
sandy, ut

I don't believe god has a hand when things are going good or bad. Good and bad things happen due to choices and sometimes chance. Think about it, many evil people have alot of money and an easy way through life. Many good hearted people have a hard time through life, and have little money. Righteous people die unexpectedly, evil people live long lives... There is no pattern of if you do good, then good things will happen in your life. It just doesn't work that way.

zoar63
Mesa, AZ

@Brahmabull

"I don't believe god has a hand when things are going good or bad. Good and bad things happen due to choices and sometimes chance. Think about it, many evil people have alot of money and an easy way through life. Many good hearted people have a hard time through life, and have little money. Righteous people die unexpectedly, evil people live long lives... There is no pattern of if you do good, then good things will happen in your life. It just doesn't work that way."

God is like a master chess player he thinks many movements in advance and in the end the opposition is always checkmated.

Gracie
Boise, ID

Brahmabull: "There is no pattern of if you do good, then good things will happen in your life."

True. There are no guarantees that our doing good will produce a safe and comfortable life for us here. LDS teachings point out that we're here to prove ourselves worthy of better things. It's a war we're in between good and evil, and as the hymn goes, "We Are All Enlisted." Obedience under fire--under the difficulties of life--prepares us for a better world to come. The Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus comes to mind: Luke 16:19-31.

Brahmabull
sandy, ut

zoar63

If god was like a chessmaster, there would be no such thing as children being killed. There would be no heinous acts of violence, they would all be prevented. That is why I have determined that he doesn't have a hand in our lives. He is watching, no doubt. but he can't interfere, because if he could he would never let crimes against children happen.

Just an Observer
Salt Lake City, UT

estreetshuffle: I agree. My family went through a difficult period of five years in Utah--interestingly; things improved considerably when we moved back out of state--in three wards in which we coincidentally received not a single home teaching visit. We did get one phone call early on that I probably should have returned, because it was the last I heard from the brother; no attempt was made to talk to us at church and we never did find out who he was.

The difficult lesson that I learned from it was that, not only did I need to try to take care of myself and my family spiritually, but I needed to do everything I could to put myself in the position to help others in that regard as well. As you might imagine, yes, I do my home teaching regularly. ;-)

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