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Comments about ‘Utah braces for another round of drought’

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Published: Thursday, April 4 2013 3:30 p.m. MDT

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New to Utah
PAYSON, UT

Water shortages and rationing should be expected. Utah should reign in its
Unsustainable growth and live within the parameters mother nature and common sense dictate.

Lonster
Sandy, UT

While technically we don't live in a desert, we do live where it's just plain dry by nature. So we shouldn't be surprised at all by this.

andyjaggy
American Fork, UT

It was a strange winter, tons of moisture in the valleys but very little in the mountains,

My neighbor has already started watering his lawn twice a day every day of the week. It's a complete waste, but when irrigation water is charged at a flat rate, there is little incentive to change your habits.

I would love to see a trend where we don't landscape our entire yards in water guzzling grass. Native vegetation can be quite pretty if done right, and use a ton less water. If anyone knows the numbers I would love to know what percentage of our water usage goes towards lawn care.

jsf
Centerville, UT

The first two posts bring a little of LOL out. first "New to Utah" says we should reign in unsustainable growth, to do that we should not have allowed you into the state. Would you leave to get that sustainable growth? The next on says "technically we don't live in a desert..." no technically we are absolutely living in a desert. The mountains may not be but from the foothills to the pilot mountain it is called the Great Salt Lake Desert. Less than eight inches of rain annually.

BYU Track Star
Los Angeles, CA

Utah's Water Agencies must be having alot of sleepless nights these days. Not only from this winter's poor winter precipitation, but also the prospect that Utah's Population will double in the next 40 years. Where will the additional water come from to support that future population? Paying water users to rip out their English Garden lawns would be a good start. Think Mesquite and Las Vegas xeriscapes.

I think the Des-News staff needs to start asking these questions now. The answers may not be pretty. But the Cliff Dwellers of Mesa Verde had to deal with this same issue a 1,000 years ago AND look how it turned out for them.

wer
South Jordan, UT

Actually, we do live in a desert. Utah is the second driest state in the country.

It's past time for home owners to switch to low water use landscaping and for local agencies to offer incentives for lower water use.

New to Utah
PAYSON, UT

JSF it is always threatening to have someone think outside of the box of unsustainable population growth. Utah's quality of life and severe water shortages should be addressed now not when it reaches crisis status. Packing people in like sardines and then experiencing horrible air quality are expected results not something unexpected or unforseen.

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