Comments about ‘Is the gender pay gap a myth?’

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Published: Tuesday, March 19 2013 6:00 a.m. MDT

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Chris B
Salt Lake City, UT

Brain surgeons should get paid more than secretaries.

Fact. More men are brain surgeons than women.

Fact. More women are secretaries than men.

If this causes the average man to be paid more than the average woman, I have one response:

GOOD!

Counter Intelligence
Salt Lake City, UT

truth and reality have never been feminist strong points
without passive/aggressive victim power - feminism loses all its steam
and feminists daily prove that power is more important than real women

UtahBlueDevil
Durham, NC

Chris... sorry to tell you.... your age is showing....

Anytime anyone is paid on anything other that performance and experience.... the pay scale is wrong. It really is that simple.

Sex, Age, Race, Religion.... not any of them should have a single thing to do with earning ability.

Any employer who pays their employees on anything other than job performance.... they too get what they deserve. Not on what you wear, not on your weight, or your height, and actually not even on what school you went to. If comes down to your performance.

I actually ended an interview once with a perspective employer when they pulled out a binder to discuss pay.... I was no longer interested. If I do well, pay me well. If I do poorly, do me the favor and "let me go" so I can go find what I can do well.

Hawkeye79
Iowa City, IA

There are four key variables ignored by the "77 cents" study that is so often quoted by feminist groups. Feel free to judge for yourself whether you think they should influence how much someone is paid:

1) Number of hours worked (women, on average, tend to work fewer hours per week than men)
2) Organizational tenure (women, on average, tend to work fewer years with the same company)
3) Type of work (women, on average, tend to gravitate away from certain jobs)
4) Negotiation of pay (women, on average, are less inclined to negotiate their salary)

Accounting for those 4 factors alone reduces the 23 cent gap to 6 cents at most (2-6 cents, depending on whose estimate you use), and there are other factors that have been hypothesized to play a role as well, including gender differences in where people choose to live.

annewandering
oakley, idaho

Comparable does not put Walmart clerks against doctors. It puts clerks against clerks etc. Women get 77% less for COMPARABLE work. So now. Justify that not an imaginary complaint.

Two For Flinching
Salt Lake City, UT

@ annewandering

Read the article. Women do get paid the same as men for comparable work.

LVIS
Salt Lake City, UT

annwandering

Do you have ANY evidence of that? Not rumors, 'stories I've heard', anecdotes, etc. Please provide the real-life proof. So now. Justify that not an imaginary complaint.

jbp
Yorba Linda, CA

Many studies are so manipulated or have so many confounders that they virtually deem themselves unreliable or invalid. Case and point, I am currently studying to become an eye doctor, which we were recently required to take a course on statistical data and interpreting studies. In one example the instructor presented a fairly recent study on the pay difference between male and female eye doctors. The study suggested there is a wide margin between men and women, with men making much more. The confounded in this study was that it didn't account for time on the job. The men averaged more than 10 years more experience than the women. Everyone knows you make more money the longer you are in you career. Interestingly, when the numbers were recalculated between men and women on the based on length of time working as eye doctors the pay was virtually the same. Any study must account for the confounders that may be present in a given study to provide an accurate and reliable result that can be generalized to the population. This study MAY compare the same job, but that doesn't mean they are equally qualified or deserve equal pay.

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