Quantcast

Comments about ‘Downtown convention hotel bill fails in House’

Return to article »

Published: Thursday, March 14 2013 10:55 p.m. MDT

Comments
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
wmcot
Murray, UT

Good! Haven't we learned anything from the Federal Government getting involved with businesses? What were we going to call this hotel, GM? Lehmann Brothers? How about Hotel Bailout?

Stick to running the state, let investors run businesses.

Makid
Kearns, UT

I hope people are ready for their taxes to go up.

If Salt Lake County and Salt Lake City can't come up with a way to get the Convention Hotel, taxes across the state will go up to help plug a $40 Million dollar gap yearly as Outdoor Retailer will be leaving the state.

What is sad is that this was a property tax bill. The State couldn't even let the developer keep some of the money from the increase in property value to pay for public items such as Parking, Infrastructure, Meeting Space and Exhibit Space.

What is sad is that you will never find a developer that will build something for the public without compensation. The Hotel itself was to cost just over $200 Million. $100 Million (State, County and City) contributions were for public items only. They had nothing to do with subsidizing a developer or picking one over another.

That is like saying building roads and sewers is picking areas over another when it benefits everyone. No ones taxes would have gone up with the Hotel but all will go up without it.

Goodbye OR and any other large convention, Hello tax increases.

marxist
Salt Lake City, UT

Such measures are how the wealthy use the public sector to feather their own nests, hold cities ransom, whipsaw one city against another, and generally increase Marxian surplus value (McAdams, look it up). This all shows how the two major parties differ but slightly in their treatment of the great unwashed.

wmcot
Murray, UT

To Makid,

Do you really think your taxes would not go up if this hotel was built? The whole reason for building this hotel is to host the Outdoor Retailers which come to the state for a short time twice a year. Let's assume they stay an average of two weeks each time. That means that for 48 weeks out of the year the hotel would be operating at less than full capacity (as pretty much all downtown hotels operate now. With the hotel unable to sustain itself for 48 weeks of the year, as well as taking away business from the other hotels that have been in place for many years, we would see government stepping in to subsidize all the hotels. That would increase your taxes! Government does not belong in business in any way, shape or form - it is always a disaster and the taxpayers pay for the mistake. Just look at the federal government's bailouts, buying shares of GM and others, Obamacare, etc. and see the nightmares that occur when government interferes with normal business operation.If this hotel is a money making idea, why aren't major hotel chains fighting to build it?

wmcot
Murray, UT

One example of how government and business don not mix is Murray City. Murray decided it would be a great idea to get into the fiber optic internet business with Utopia. Murray invested heavily in Utopia and had all city offices as well as Murray School District and others connected to the system. Utopia was a flop with the public. The costs for residential hookup are extravagant.

Now, Murray sits with a contract to Utopia in the neighborhood of $2 Million (or $2 Billion?) dollars for the next several decades in the future. Because of this huge debt , Murray has not been able to afford raises for police, fire, and city employees. There is a mass-exodus of our law enforcement and city employees to work for other cities.

So Murray has really fast internet (if you can afford to connect to it) but the quality of their public services is declining daily (drive through Murray and see the condition of the roads.)

Another example of why government should stay out of private businesses - government is incompetent in the business industry.

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments