Quantcast

Comments about ‘Have we in the United States lost our edge?’

Return to article »

Published: Thursday, March 14 2013 1:34 p.m. MDT

Comments
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
CWEB
Orem, UT

Is that a sincere question? Really? The question to ask is--can we do anything to reverse it, or is it too late? I think its too late. I believe the left has nailed the coffin shut on the U.S. It is just a matter of time. Financially, morally, and the destruction of the United States is all just on some time line.

Ernest T. Bass
Bountiful, UT

It's the liberals. If we could just cut all taxes on the rich, raise taxes on the poorest 50% and do away with the minimum wage, America could be #1 again.
Also, build more bombs and fighter jets.

Johnny Triumph
American Fork, UT

Yup, we've dropped the ball and will soon fall behind other nations. We're not very innovative any more.

radically_independent
Orem, Utah

" I believe the left has nailed the coffin shut on the U.S. It is just a matter of time."

:"It's the liberals."

Please - give me a stinking break. :Most of the countries that are taking names and kicking you-know-what are far more socialist than even the most progressive liberal here in this country dreams of. Lets take a reality check on the partisan rhetoric, because this has been building over the last many decades.

Some of the biggest reasons we are falling behind is our government isn't funding the next big thing like they did through the space race and tech surge. Most basic research, which had it been left up to the bean counters, would not have happened. There was no practicle "need" to develop the flat screen panels. No one at home was saying I would only buy a TV if they were only 3 inches thick. It was the space and defense that demanded these innovations.

Not a single person thought they needed a home computer 30 years ago. Computers were for corporations. Again, the microprocessor was developed through demand for more mobil compute power.

Lets stop poeticizing everything. Lets go compete again.

Ty Kiisel
Salt Lake City, UT

CWEB, I think the finger pointing does nothing to solve the problem. This isn't really about politics anyway. It's about chief executives too focused on profits today and not focused enough on the long-term direction of their companies. It's about companies that aren't creating products the rest of the world will buy. Blaming the current administration isn't even looking at the real problem. Government doesn't run the businesses that are suffering from this short-sightedness.

However, if we were to look at who was in the White House when this trend began, you'd see it wasn't the Democrats. Nevertheless, it's far too easy to blame the brainiacs in Washington. I think it's time individual business leaders took a good long look at how they manage their businesses and the way business schools train the business leaders of tomorrow.

Ty Kiisel
Salt Lake City, UT

Ernest, you crack me up.

RWSmith6
Providence, UT

There's apt perception here. We should've seen it coming, though. In 1993, a French economist, Michel Albert, published his Capitalism vs. Capitalism in which America's addiction to short-term gain in favor of long-term investment is well pointed out. Albert feared that free market economics in America and Great Britain were a peril to Europe's own democratic-socialist version of capitalism. Albert predicted, pretty much right-on, what happened here in 2008 and subsequently, in Europe.
Having the wrong people in position to steer the U.S. down the wrong road has cost us dearly. Very dearly.

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments