Comments about ‘More mothers consider time better spent at full-time job’

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Published: Thursday, March 14 2013 11:30 a.m. MDT

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toosmartforyou
Farmington, UT

I suspect the recession had a great deal to do with this demographic.

If one were to ask their children, do you think they'd say having mom work full-time was "better spent" than having her at home, at least part of the day?

Cat
Centerville, UT

I have been a full time working mom for 20 years. Except for the food, clothing, shelter thing, my time would have been better spent at home raising my kids. Work is easier than being a mom. People appreciate you more and you don't have to deal with whiny people too often. However, I care about what happens to my kids more than I care about what happens to my co-workers. I could better serve the kids by being a full time mom if it weren't for that pesky need to eat, dress and have a place to sleep.

JSB
Sugar City, ID

Who are more likely to grow up to be well-adjusted--kids with full-time mothers, or kids with part-time mothers?

LValfre
CHICAGO, IL

@JSB

"Who are more likely to grow up to be well-adjusted--kids with full-time mothers, or kids with part-time mothers?"

Well young daughters who grow up with a working mom are LESS likely to look for a man to provide for them, be more independent and self-providing.

Brave Sir Robin
San Diego, CA

My mom worked full-time throughout my entire childhood. In my opinion it was the biggest mistake she made as a parent. Surprisingly, when we talked about it later, she agreed with me.

LindonMan
Lindon, UT

The demise of the family will happen slowly, but surely. Sad day.

george of the jungle
goshen, UT

Kids are only little for a little whale. The taxable income only benefited the government. What s shame. The mentality of people has declined because shame has been misplaced. Shame is when you know you did something wrong. Guilt is when every one knows.

Bebyebe
UUU, UT

Where are the fathers in this article? They are a parent too.

AveragePerson
WEST JORDAN, UT

Mothers are so important. It's sad to me that women must also think about what their future might hold when making decisions between full-time mom and career woman. My mother, after being a full-time mom, had to find work when my father divorced her after more than 35 years of marriage. She had no eduction, no career, and now, when she should be retired, is still working at age 70 because the social security (based on her work history and the self-employment of my father) is not enough to pay monthly living expenses. She never thought she would be in the situation she is in and did not have sufficient time to plan for retirement when faced with a divorce late in life.

JSB
Sugar City, ID

re. LValfre

"Well young daughters who grow up with a working mom are LESS likely to look for a man to provide for them, be more independent and self-providing." Are there valid statistical studies to support your claim?

LValfre
CHICAGO, IL

@JSB

""Well young daughters who grow up with a working mom are LESS likely to look for a man to provide for them, be more independent and self-providing." Are there valid statistical studies to support your claim?"

It's anecdotal, much like AveragePerson's mother's experience. When you're raised to be a stay at home mom, clinch on to a providing man, and live that lifestyle ... you're dependent. Divorce, death, etc. happens and you're all alone without the skills, independence, and character to be a self-provider.

I hold independent women to the highest praise. Working moms are the strongest women in the country.

germanygator
Apo, AE

A person and drop off their car with the valet attendant. A person can leave their jacket at a coat check. Parents can leave their kids at the day care. It's terrible that kids can be grouped together with such material items as jackets and cars as something to put aside for a day's "self-fulfillment".

CNN International ran a story yesterday stating that mothers only reach their full potential by working outside of the home. Also noted was that the majority of two income families can't find affordable child care (read as "free").

Here's a news alert: kids aren't pets to leave at a kennel during the day. They are people. They aren't toys or hobbies to put aside when we're tired. If you want that, then don't have kids. Have a job and at the end of your illustrious career, I promise that not one of your work "children" you supervised will ever come and visit you in your later years. Your legacy will be washed away by your replacement or with the next buyout or layoff. The purpose of families is not meant to support the almighty employer.

LauraC
SALT LAKE CITY, UT

@JSB
"Who are more likely to grow up to be well-adjusted--kids with full-time mothers, or kids with part-time mothers?"

I don't know any part-time mothers. Even when I'm at work all day (due to circumstances with my husband's health that have made it necessary), I am thinking about my children all day. Then I come home, take care of them all evening, feed them in the middle of the night and wake up with them at 5:30 to play, shower, eat breakfast, etc., before the babysitter comes. I'm sure there are some out there but, like I said, I haven't met them.

germanygator
Apo, AE

@LauraC--

Keep fighting the good fight and keep your head held high!!

xscribe
Colorado Springs, CO

toosmartforyou says: "If one were to ask their children, do you think they'd say having mom work full-time was "better spent" than having her at home, at least part of the day?"

Probably depends on a few factors, age being one of them. But since we know what you are trying to say, how about inserting the word "father" for "mother." Bet you would get the same answer.

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