Comments about ‘Community celebrates anti-discrimination successes at Capitol’

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Published: Wednesday, March 13 2013 8:06 p.m. MDT

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worf
Mcallen, TX

In all my life, I have never found it to be fair. You learn to deal with it. I was almost denied a police job because of being short, but got it by out witting the competition. You learn to do, and survive. Unfairness come in many forms.

Like a child crying to mommy, we have a group of people whining to government because things are not fair.

How pathetic, and lazy.

Tolstoy
salt lake, UT

@Worf
You are right comparing an act of discrimination to a child crying for their mother is pathetic .

Tolstoy
salt lake, UT

@worf
So if the lgbt community "outwit" "their oppressors and get laws outlawing discrimination then you will be fine with it right?

worf
Mcallen, TX

@Tolstoy--how do you legislate something like this without taking away freedoms? Right or wrong, a landlord should be able to decide who he/she rents out to, or a business owner deciding who to hire. It's American freedom.

Out witting means,--creating your own businesses, and hire, or rent to whom ever you want. Why set the state, or feds as referees?

Everyone gets discriminated at some point in their lives. Nothing new. It's human nature that we deal with, and crying about it to the state only makes it worse.

Ain't got time for dat!

amazondoc
USA, TN

@worf --

"@Tolstoy--how do you legislate something like this without taking away freedoms? Right or wrong, a landlord should be able to decide who he/she rents out to, or a business owner deciding who to hire."

The very same argument was used years ago by the people who fought to maintain racial segregation. Equal rights means **equal rights for all** -- not just for people you happen to like. And yes, landlords CAN decide to whom they want to rent -- they just have to use REAL reasons for their decisions, not reasons based on bigotry. The only "freedom" anyone is taking away is the freedom to discriminate against others -- and that isn't one of the freedoms protected in the US Constitution.

"I was almost denied a police job because of being short, but got it by out witting the competition."

Being short has concrete, measurable consequences for the performance of police duties. Just as being extremely tall would in the military (my own brother was ineligible for military service because he's too tall). In contrast, being homosexual does not. That's why height is a valid criterion for hiring in some jobs, while sexual orientation isn't.

xscribe
Colorado Springs, CO

By Worf's argument, we should be able to go back to segregation: Any business owner should be able to deny access to their establishment based on race alone!

worf
Mcallen, TX

@xscribe--amazondoc---you're talking about coveting.

If you deny me access to your bank account, automobile, house, or food, then you're a bigot. I have a right to your stuff, because I'm broke, starving, and you can't deny me.

Housing, or a business, are owned by a person. It's that persons decision (not government) on what to do with it.

The laws are wrong here, and un-American.

amazondoc
USA, TN

@worf --

"@xscribe--amazondoc---you're talking about coveting."

Nope, we're talking about discrimination. It doesn't matter whether you believe me. Just look up some of the Supreme Court cases dealing with racial discrimination in housing, for instance Shelley v. Kraemer (1948) and Jones v. Mayer Co. (1968). This isn't some newfangled idea we're talking about here -- the anti-discrimination principle was established many decades ago.

The 1968 Supreme Court case in particular specifically confirmed that "all racial discrimination, private as well as public, in the sale or rental of property" is illegal.

Also in 1968 Congress passed the Federal Fair Housing Act, which further banned housing discrimination based on "race, color, religion, sex, national origin, familial status or handicap".

You said: "The laws are wrong here, and un-American."

The anti-discrimination laws conform with the US Constitution, as affirmed by the US Supreme Court. You can't get much more American than that.

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