Comments about ‘Move to relocate state prison takes another step forward’

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Published: Wednesday, March 13 2013 12:55 p.m. MDT

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Willie
Saint George, UT

Any ideas as to where this more efficient and modern facility would be located?

itsjustme
Vernal, UT

The last paragraph of the article states: "The cost for relocating the prison is estimated at as much as $600 million, but backers of the plan say at least two-thirds of that cost would be recouped in savings from selling the Draper property and by constructing a more efficient, modern facility."

That means the taxpayers will still be on the hook for $200 millions dollars to move the prison. Can we (Utah taxpayers) afford to spend that much money? Who stands to make money by having the prison moved? Does the $600 million include training an entirely new staff, or moving current staff, depending on the new location?

Why close something that still has a lot of useful life in it. Something smells to high heaven about this whole thing.

mcclark
Salt Lake City, UT

I agree with Mike Noel on something, has the world started spinning backwards?

mightyhunterhaha
Kaysville, UT

Neiderhauser needs to retire. privatization is not good for utah. we've tried it it was BAD! Other states have treid it and it's BAD! Why can't he figure that out!

There You Go Again
Saint George, UT

A state legislator says...

"We're talking about human dignity, that we treat prisoners as people and not as commodities,"

Why not go a little bit farther...

How about...

We're talking about human dignity, that we treat all Americans as people and not as commodities.

Perfect.

Fitness Freak
Salt Lake City, UT

WHICH company is willing to pay 400 million for 600 acres in Bluffdale/Draper?

I suspect some VERY powerful forces are at work at the legislature to push this through. I also suspect the costs for the new prison are underestimated, by at least 25%. But only after the deal is approved we'll be told what they are.

Conversely, I doubt if ANYONE at the legislature really believes they can get even 200 million for the land, especially since all the buildings would have to be demolished to make the property developable. Not in todays economy.

How about all the transit of prisoners? The prison has to continuously ferry inmates to the courts, or to UMed center.

How about all the community volunteers that go there to have family home evenings, offer substance abuse counseling, etc.

Wherever the new prison goes, will those individuals still be available to help inmates?

WHATEVER cost savings the state makes with building a more effecient prison will be lost in the day-to-day transit of both prisoners and work personnel.

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