Comments about ‘Wolf advocates howl over $300k spending request’

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Published: Wednesday, March 6 2013 5:30 p.m. MST

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wYo8
Rock Springs, WY

Keep them out.

wYo8
Rock Springs, WY

Make them a preditor anywhere out side the buffer zone of Yellowstone. Just like WYOMING is doing. The wolves will be held in check. The fear of man will remain in these killers.

Mountanman
Hayden, ID

Look no farther than the experiences of big game biologists in Idaho, Wyoming and Montana to learn what wolves will do to Utah's wildlife. We have lost over 70% of our elk to wolves according to biologists here and the damage is still increasing and for what? We are sick and tired of feeding the federal government's wolves! Advice to you folks in Utah; do what ever it takes to keep wolves out of your state or you will regret it!

annewandering
oakley, idaho

I second keeping them out. Better and easier to keep them out than to get them back out.

NT
SomewhereIn, UT

Keep them out at whatever cost. Big mistake to "reintroduce" a non-native THRIVING species throughout Wyoming, Idaho and Montana to begin with. I will be trying to do my part to help reduce their impact in a couple of those states - in order to help to preserve the impacted big game herds and livestock.

SSS

one old man
Ogden, UT

MM -- where do you get that supposed 70% loss of elk number. Show us some documentation.

Reports from those states indicate there may be a 20% drop, but they also attribute much of that reduction to causes other than wolves.

Do you know what the word TRUTH means?

Duckhunter
Highland, UT

If there is no issue, and no agenda for getting wolves into Utah, then why is Mr. Robinson up in arms about it? Me thinks he doth protest to much.

Clue Bay
AMERICAN FORK, UT

I wish all these wolve advocates would go camping with their families in all these areas they demanded wolves are introduced (You can not use reintroduced as these wolces were not native to this area). Lets see how they like to put their families at risk. I am sick and tired of peoples from populated areas that have no wildlife or native game telling us how we need to manage our lands! It is ignorance!

one old man
Ogden, UT

Too many people around here were scared when their mommies read the Big Bad Woof to them. Grow up!

Mountanman
Hayden, ID

Old Man: The regional wildlife biologist for N. Idaho told several people, including myself, that information personally! Of course it was very politically incorrect for him to say it. Anyone, like myself, who has spend any time in the mountains knows what he said was absolutely true. Had wolves howling around my tent many times during my multiple over night hiking, backpacking trips and I never see any elk anymore. The mountains are nearly empty of elk! And for what?

nota3333
los angeles, CA

Wolves are native to Utah. Wolves have done an amazing job keeping the elk and deer populations in check in Idaho and Montana. The wolves are back and will continue harvesting the elk, deer, and moose populations year round. I have mo doubt that wolves will be back in Utah to keep the elk population in check over there. Elk, deer, moose, etc must be managed and there is no better wildlife manager than the wolves. Elk, deer, moose, etc will continue be to harvested by the wolves year round in Idaho, Montana, etc.

nota3333
los angeles, CA

The wolves have been proven to be beneficial towards other wildlife. Wolves harvest elk, deer, and moose year round and sometimes they leave scraps behind. Coyotes, cougars, birds, bears, etc all take advantage of the leftover scraps that the wolves leave. Wolves will continue to harvest deer, elk, and moose year round.

nota3333
los angeles, CA

The wolves are keeping the elk populations in check in Idaho. There is nothing wrong with this as the wolves have gotta eat. There are still elk left in Idaho, but the elk are behaving differently now that their top apex predator, the wolf is back. Elk move around a lot more now that the wolves are back.

annewandering
oakley, idaho

nota3333, how about if PEOPLE 'harvest' the game? We can 'harvest' and eat and do fine all by ourselves. On top of that ability we generally have the ability to not 'harvest' cows, sheep, dogs, cats, etc while we are at it.
I admit to a prejudice here. Animals are not crops like grain. When grain is eaten by mice etc we do not applaud the wildlife harvesting for us. We do not need wolves to come in and do us any services. It is odd that you are saying that it is good, even admirable, for wolves to do this yet I distinctly remember the wolf lobby saying wolves only eat mice and small rodents. I laughed at this. Now am I to believe you have all changed that line of propaganda now?

nota3333
los angeles, CA

For what? well, to feed the wolves and other wild animals. As I explained a little earlier, when wolves kill deer and elk, their leftover scraps usually get eaten by animals such as coyotes, bears, birds, cougars, etc. It's been documented how elk and deer killed by wolves provides beneficial to other wildlife species. No more elk farm for hunters. Now that the wolves are back, elk and deer will be managed by the wolves and other predators such as the cougar and bear year round.

annewandering
oakley, idaho

nota3333, Theoretical is always so much cleaner and manageable from LA. You see a beautiful picture of a wolf and fall in love. Wolves in the wild are not easily manageable pets who know their job and do it. They are in truth wild, intelligent, cunning, hungry and destructive. Yes they do leave bits and pieces of bodies behind them. Mangled, no longer breathing, toys even.
What you need to remember is that people are animals too. We have our territories and reasons to protect those territories and our food supplies. We are part of the environment and have a right to exist. I would much rather the native cougars etc balance out what we need balancing. Why should we bring in uncontrollable 'hit men'.
Since the wolves have come in we have seen more cougars in inhabited areas than before. I wonder why that might be? Are they being pushed out of their natural habitat?
Ican not see one single valid reason to bring in the 'beautiful' wolf. If you want them then I am sure the fish and game can bring them down to you.

Clue Bay
AMERICAN FORK, UT

Nota3333 - You obviously have lived in the urban jungle to long. The wolves do not leave scraps for others to eat - they make scraps out of everything. I have seen sheep herds decimated and not to eat, but to kill. I have friends in Sun Valley that are terrorified to go out side as the wolves are killing elk in their back yards. Wolves are a killing machine and they enjoy it. You want the luxury of Los Angeles and think a weekend get away will be wonderful to see a pack of wolves running around. It is going to take a pack to kill people before we really see how serious is this risk. You get the convenience of a 1,000 miles between the pack and you, while we live in the area we have settled and payed to develop and now have wolves expanding way beyond the original scope of the plan. If you love wolves so much - get a pack in the Hollywood Hills and see how quickly they decimate everything. The Mexican wolve was also native to California and I do not see you pushing for wolves there!

Brave Sir Robin
San Diego, CA

@Clue Bay

"I wish all these wolve advocates would go camping with their families in all these areas they demanded wolves are introduced (You can not use reintroduced as these wolces were not native to this area)."

I take my family camping in wolf country all the time - we haven't been attacked yet. Neither have any of the other millions of people who have done the same.

Oh, and FYI, wolves ARE native to Utah.

George
Bronx, NY

So Utah is going to waist money chasing ghost passed on scare tactics and fake claims? Can I get 300,000 to. Keep the bogeyman out of Utah? It is well worth it after all I told mountain man so.

Prodicus
Provo, UT

I need $300,000 for keeping the elephants away.

Ridiculous.

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