Quantcast

Comments about ‘Group rallies on Capitol Hill for decision to expand Medicaid and insure more Utahns’

Return to article »

Published: Friday, March 1 2013 4:15 p.m. MST

Comments
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
DN Subscriber 2
SLC, UT

All these "advocates for the uninsured" sure are working hard to spend OTHER people's money.

While many very gullible people actually believe that the federal government has "free money" to spend lavishly, others realize it is just tax money confiscated from someone else, or borrowed from the Chinese (to be repaid with interest from other tax money yet to be collected).

Accepting "free money" now, traps the state into compliance with all sorts of current and future government mandates, and after 3 years federal funding drops to 90% of the cost (more likely less than that, because there is no money- we are bankrupt!).

I would suggest to the "advocates" that:
(a) while many people lack heath INSURANCE. they are not being denied health CARE.
(b) Obama's planned cutting reimbursement for providers will make CARE harder to get- regardless of who is paying.
(c) Instead of spending other people's money for health care, how about if these "advocates" spend their own money to buy insurance or provide treatments.

Utah needs to reject the bait of federal funds up front for a program sure to cost more and be reimbursed less than we are told now.

Maudine
SLC, UT

@ DNSubscriber2: Who pays for the costs of uninsured Utahns?

Just as there is no free money, there is no free healthcare. The question is, do you want to pay for insurance for them so they can be treated earlier when it is cheaper? Or do you want to pay for the more expensive care later down the road (keeping in mind that if the later care is not successful, you get to pay survivors' benefits and other things)?

By expanding Medicaid and providing insurance, you lower societal costs of illness and increase the chances of people getting to the point where they pay for themselves and contribute more to society.

Do you see only the short-term small picture or are you capable of looking at long-term, big picture benefits?

DistantThunder
Vincentown, NJ

I sat in traffic court for a late car registration ticket. I heard a man stand up and talk about how he had been an alcoholic for years, destroyed his liver, got a liver transplant, and now was trying to talk himself out of a drunk driving ticket. He was shabbily clothed, used poor grammar and it made me wonder who paid for his liver transplant and the subsequent upkeep of drugs - since it was apparent he was working on destroying his new liver.

Money grows on trees, so there is no problem.

DN Subscriber 2
SLC, UT

Maudine- You are correct that early treatment is good. Insurance is good. Neither is dependent exclusively on a massive government bureaucracy funded by tax dollars.

Charitable contributions (to providers- including hospitals and clinics) or the many hours of treatment donated by generous providers can help meet those goals. Allowing health savings accounts where people actually pay for their treatment can drastically reduce costs and improve treatment by eliminating the layers of non-value added bureaucracy and stifling regulations.

Of course, growing the economy so more people could afford competitively priced insurance plans is a much better solution, but Obamacare mandated insurance policies have raised the cost for everyone (and decreased the number of health care providers) while his other policies are killing jobs.

Overall, creating more dependency on government for womb to tomb coverage is more harmful to individuals than to promote freedom of choice and encourage economic growth and self reliance.

hopefully
Salt Lake City, UT

Sorry DN Sub but this is not about "other people's money". This is about our federal tax dollars,appropriated by the Congress and President of our beloved country, going to a purpose most Americans support. Most of the people at this rally will not benefit from the Medicaid expansion personally-- they just love the people of this state and their country.

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments