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Comments about ‘NYC restaurant workers advocate minimum wage increase in new 'Money' music video’

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Published: Thursday, Feb. 28 2013 12:00 p.m. MST

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Chris B
Salt Lake City, UT

"Sixty percent of restaurant workers make poverty wages and those that receive tips make a base salary of $5 per hour, according to Restaurant Opportunities Center United, which advocates better wages and working conditions for the restaurant workforce. That can equate to as little as $10,000 per year for full-time employees."

"The idea that you can live on 10 grand in New York City is crazy," Kink said."

TIPS?

No one said you can live on 10 grand.

Include tips and lets paint the whole picture and then lets discuss

The fact King purposely leaves out tips shows King is deceitful.

No one suggests you can live on 10 grand. Every waitress in the country who makes $5 an hours receives tips.

Don't hide vital facts and make untrue statements.

I just have a hard time feeling sorry when people are leaving out half the equation

TIPS!

TOO
Sanpete, UT

Oh you can't live on that huh? Who's forcing you to stay? Who says you can't live elsewhere or work elsewhere?
Here's a TIP to add on those that Chris B. said: if you're not happy, talk to your boss, and if you don't like the response--andale pues.

ms
Draper, UT

There is a lot of convusion over this topic. But the largest confusion is not recognizing that working in a resturant was never intended to be a full time job, but instead a part time job to get extra money to help one out on extra bills they may have or things they want to save for above that which their normal full time job that pays real wages (for which they may also need an education) permits them to achieve. Believing that one can make a "normal" wage on the backs of the cost of fprepared food is believing that prepared food is a staple and it is not, it is a luxury and luxury's don't garner one's full financial support because they are just that luxury's . Thus, if prepared food is a luxury and this luxury becomes too expensive because the uneducated workers that help provide it demand more money, then this luxurluyr will suffer as the public will purchase less of it as it is not a necessity.

ms
Draper, UT

Note: when I say "uneducated worker", I do not say this to say that all such workers are uneducated but to stipulate that an education is not required for such a job. What these workers should recognize is that anyone who eats at their establishment they are doing them a favor by doing so as they don't have to purchase prepared food. Look what graocery stores have had to do in order to survive they have had to reduce their profit margins and they are a necessity , resturant workers are just kikking themselves when they try to classify what they do as a career when it is really just a part time job in reality. If you want full time wages create something of real value such as software, or something else in which a skill which is more than carryinng food from point A to point B is required. .

ms
Draper, UT

To expect full time wages from what has always been perceived as a part time job for extra money or a part time job (whether or not you elect to work full time hours there or not, that doesn't classify it as a full time job from which you should expect full time educated type wages from) is just expecting too much from what has traditionally until the last twenty years been seen as just a stepping stone to higher paying employment , but has somehow now been confused with the wages of a job for which an education or specialized training is really required.

ms
Draper, UT

To do so would be like believing that the newspaper boy who delivers my newspaper everyday (which is not dis-similar from delivering my food ) is entitled to a "living wage" when all of us already know that it is a part time job that people do to earn a little extra money, bot as a replacement for trained or educated employment.

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