Comments about ‘Parents gather to support Lone Peak's McGeary’

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Published: Wednesday, Feb. 27 2013 11:10 p.m. MST

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Really Concerned & Why
Cedar Hills, UT

Amy, that is a very fair article. I was at the meeting tonight and want to add one more thing. In the spring meeting where the CEU camp was discussed, while it was not mentioned that the camp was voluntary, no mention was made that the camp was mandatory either. Many athletes missed the camp just like many athletes chose not to order Under Armor merchandise. No one was singled out nor were they punished in either situation.

DodgerDoug
Salem, UT

Geez parents of Lone Peak... what is in the water up there. First you run a great coach and gentleman out of the program in Monte Morgan and now you're running out another great guy and coach.

Something to think about
Ogden, UT

All high school camps sponsored by outside entities function this way. That's how coaches get paid for their time at such events. They may word the situation differently, but it is the same in principle. This is why many schools hold their own camps now.

Other schools who have "sponsor" apparrel deals also function the same way as LP. If they, LP, are wrong then all are wrong. The concept is based upon the idea that the company discounts official gear sold the to school, but makes up for it with apparrel sales to fans and such. It's a way to make up for the lack of funding by the school districts to the programs.

I'm not a fan of the system, but it is what it is. I can assure you, as a person "inside" this arena, Coach McGeary is no different than any other high school coach in football or basketball.

I too believe, regardless of Coach McGeary's "guilt or innocence", this is a situation where parents are out of control and jealous of others success.

SLCguy
Murray, UT

"We look like a bunch of pretentious parents up here"

That is because you are, Lone Peak. If you quack like a duck.......

Another thing;
Just because you played in the NFL doesn't mean your kid automatically has the size or ability to play Football. It's just genetics. When a 6'4" guy marries a 5'2" woman; there are decent odds that your kid will be 5'9" and suddenly Football is no longer the best idea in the world.

Bored to the point of THIS!
Ogden, UT

I'm guessing the 20 parents who complained had great lawyers!

SLCguy
Murray, UT

Bored,

No idea on if they were "great" or not. (actually I'd bet the "not" side)

But they did rattle their scabbard and the District folded like a cheap suit.

Then this certain District threaten to fire a certain , now ex-, coach from teaching if certain other parents didn't quickly and quietly go away.

High School Sports, as we knew them, are dying a quick death under the the oppression of entitled Parents who think the MVP trophy that there child got for playing 2nd grade, City League, Soccer ACTUALLY means something.

Ville
Salt Lake City, UT

@ Bored to the point of THIS !.......you got it rght, some of the parents are EVEN lawyers. According to some friends who have kids who are stars as well as role players in the LP program, there are a few parents who are just more interested in their own child, than a successful team and achieving great results for all. Even sadder is, most of those parents can't look in a mirror and realize that their kid is not all region, all state or even a D-1 scholorship athlete. If you ask those parents, the stats of their kids are probably more important than the wins for an entire team. Some of the parents are the ones that have senior kids who finished their playing days so don't care as much to the future of the school. Someone ought to remind them that there are actually more academic scholorships and grants for college available to kids than athletic scholorships. LP has now run out 2 football coaches and a couple of baseball coaches. Nice.

But Then Again
AMERICAN FORK, UT

My son is LP football player and we support Coach Mcgeary. He is a man who has done a thankless job with integrity and dedication. My spouse and I have often wondered how he manages to keep a high school team going, all the while having to deal with the parents of his players.

I was present at the meeting last spring. When he announced the Under Armour issue, I believe he thought that was the direction we were headed. The documents show that he learned he couldn't enter into such a contract and the contract was torn up. We ended up getting Under ARmour merchandise at a GREAT price, yet weren't penalized for wearing other brands. My own son wore a different brand all season and was NEVER spoken to about it. It was NOT a big thing.

The CEU camp was NOT required. There were many players who did not attend because of conflicts and weren't removed from the team. My own player wouldn't have missed it for the world, however, and most players attended because they WANTED to.

I am more worried about the "concerned parents" who had an agenda. It's shameful!

Braxton
ogden, ut

Sounds like LP is headed in the same direction as Weber High. Same deal where the parents with entitlement attitudes have ran out coaches, which resulted in the hire of mediocre coaches which chased away star players which translates to a losing record. Keep in mind, Weber won a state championship too and then headed down hill fast. I think the email exchange between the coach and Universal Athletics may be what ticked the Principal off. It was obvious that they were trying to avoid the process. What is interesting is how the LP basketball contract is the only one that is good. Hmmmm, makes me wonder, they have a run at the National title and have traveled all around the country to play in national tournaments..... It take a lot of fund raising to do this....wink, wink.

Flashback
Kearns, UT

You got to wonder if there was an under the table kickback the coach to from Under Armour or Universal Athletic.

If a company wants to sponsor a schools athletic program, let them go to the district officials and work that deal out. Let every school in the district benefit from such a deal. Not a supposed elite program like Lone Peak. That way there is no graft and corruption that will stink up a coach. It is always better to avoid the appearance of evil.

Look at what happened to Cottonwood. Granite district put in a rule that a school athletic booster/ financial contributer can't be a coach. Cate had to leave, he took all his toys with him, Cottonwood's under the table recruiting of players from other schools diminished, and last football season, Cottonwood footbal stank, even with one of supposed best QB's in the state.

Money corrupts. Lack of controls on the money or improper handling just makes for more potential problems.

All the school districts should set forth a policy for all their employees to follow that stops this type of stuff from happening and funnels all money to a central pot.

JamastrJ
Eagle mountain, UT

One of the problems that exist in Utah HS athletics is the mixed message. Most of their jobs are based on winning. The good ones want to win anyway. They are not compensated for their time. When you consider not only the practice time, but time watching film, scouting other teams, making sure the kids keep their grades up not to mention dealing with parents and administrators. They should be compensated by whatever means necessary to justify the time away from their families and the personal expenses they incur. If those entitled parents at Lone Peak do not get it who does. They just won a State Championship in Football and I'll bet the Coach worked as many hours for the team as a full time paid professional or at worst college coach. Any idea how much time Quincy Lewis works for his program over the course of a full year? If you know what its like to have your kid play for a team that never wins, you'll probably find a coach that is not willing to sacrifice his personal time to win games for ungrateful parents and non supportive administrators.

Goldendomer
Holladay, UT

This kind of rubbish has been going on at Skyline for years. We have had to deal with a certain group of about 10 parents for the last 4 years. The problem has mostly boiled down to playing time. When they figured out Coach Dupaix was not going to bend to their will they did everything they could to make it miserable for him and his staff. As a result, the winningest coach in Utah history retired and went on a LDS Mission.
The new coach’s seat wasn’t even warm before they were down at the district offices complaining about him. He was the best candidate to takeover by far. These people were so ruthless they even publically accused the new coach and an assistant of lying on their resumes. Then they accused the coaches wife of lying to the media about her husband’s qualifications. All through anonymous E-Mail of course. Thank goodness the principal at Skyline supports his people.
Limit these Coaches exposure as much as possible and let the districts negotiate the uniform contracts. Better yet, take the big corporations out of HS Sports all together.

patriot
Cedar Hills, UT

Why in the world anyone would want to coach high school athletics is beyond me. My son played baseball for LP and I saw the coach out there every spring dragging the field and doing other fix ups - on his own time. I saw that same coach work his tail off not only during the season but also running summer and fall teams for next to nothing. I have alot of respect for high school coaches simply because they get paid peanuts but they provide a great experience for our sons and daughters at the same time. At LP the pressure to win and the pressure to provide playing time is extreme and burn out some pretty quickly.

Bluto
Sandy, UT

Time for the Harper Valley PTA to step off and get a life.
Looks like their boys aren't getting enough playing time.

Busy body Glaydys Kravitz types.

eagle
Provo, UT

I saw this quote on another blog and thought it was classic and went about like this.

"The biggest challenge for any high school coach is having a mediocre athlete with rich parents."

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