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Comments about ‘Bill to give college credit for military training passes committee’

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Published: Tuesday, Feb. 12 2013 5:50 p.m. MST

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My2Cents
Taylorsville, UT

Having your cake and eating it too, and this idea must be limited and cautious by giving credit. First of all colleges and military training have nothing in common since the military training does not have a civilian business compatible with military training. This is another attempt to short change and eliminate learning and knowledge in an attempt to qualify unqualified people with worthless specialty degrees and titles.

Being a vet and knowing what these guys learn and use are not as closely related as most vets think. Military gives abbreviated education for specialized military tools and equipment. Some basics are required but subject matter is narrow and limited so people can do one job and do that one job well. This article is making the comparison idea sound compatible but they are worlds apart and should stay separate.

Vets are excellent citizens, with pride, loyalty, and convictions of self and his abilities but exposed to secret and classified technology beyond the scope of normal college courses but not the back ground in development or creation.

Like most jobs, the military does not have any trade journals or informational publications about jobs like the civilian sector has.

Elcapitan
Ivins, UT

This is a great idea. the military service and education is a vital part of a veterans education. More credit should be given. Our liberal educators may be prejudiced agains the veteran.

DEW
Sandy, UT

Now I see why my son being so upset seeing too many people working as a civillan who never been in the military. With all those hours they put in and college won't take most of their credit is sad. No wonder my brother (former Navy Vietnam Vet) told me he had to start over after he was cut just so close to his 20th years of service becasue he became disable (loss hearings with all those guns on the ship and some internal injurys).

LDS Aerospace Engineer
Farmington, UT

My2Cents
Taylorsville, UT

First of all colleges and military training have nothing in common since the military training does not have a civilian business compatible with military training.

Like most jobs, the military does not have any trade journals or informational publications about jobs like the civilian sector has.

3:06 a.m. Feb. 13, 2013

============

My Father was a Medic in Vietnam.
He studied for 3 years to become certified.
Then spent 6 years patching up kids up and sending them home alive.
Most would've been sent home in black plastic bags.

He got no college credit for it,
but become a ParaMedic, after retaking classes he already had.
He ended up TEACHING the class and the Instructors.

I served in the USAF.
I also attended college at the time.
I could tear apart & put Boeing 747 back together again.

in my college engineering classes at the time,
I was learning about imaginary numbers and programming robots to stack legos.

BTW -
I work as a aerospace engineeer at Boeing and ATK for the last 32 years.
I use ZERO of my college education,
and 100% of my military education.

{9 credits of Fortran 77 -- 100%useless]

joseywales
Park City, UT

LDS AE- First of all, thank you for your service to our country! Actually, that's good enough for me. Thanks again

CHS 85
Sandy, UT

@LDS Aerospace Engineer

I can completely relate to your post.

I served in the military for 20 years. During that time, I spent countless hours in classrooms in both leadership training, and skills training. I was a network engineer and saw the entire computer world change several times over the years, and each new change required months of training.

When I was in for about fifteen years, I started looking for jobs as my enlistment is about up, and no one would touch me because I didn't have a college degree. I stayed in, and completed a Business degree. The college gave me three hours for physical education and that was it. It didn't matter how much training I had obtained over the years.

Now I work as a network engineer - same job I did in the Army. College degree got me in the door, Army training keeps me employed.

Dr. Thom
Long Beach, CA

A colleague works with ACE (American Council on Education) and they go to military bases/schools and evaluate the relationship between military training and educational credits,. This makes it easier for university and college registrars to connect the dots between military training and college courses. Not all military courses are certified for college credit, but many are. Yes, even Ranger School got at least 1 college credit hour.

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