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Comments about ‘Doctor: death of young, healthy person from flu, 'uncommon'’

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Published: Sunday, Feb. 3 2013 9:05 p.m. MST

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OCoug
Ogden, UT

Terrible news. So sorry to the family and friends affected. Our prayers and thoughts are with you.

Harley Rider
Small Town, CT

Would like to know if this young lad received the flu shot? Quite shocking when a young strapping lad can succumb to bacterial infections. No doubt that one day bacteria will become immune to any and all antibiotics and if a person has a weakened immune system - (from being over vaccinated , has been prescribed anti biotics to many times) their god given defense for any and all diseases will have been severely compromised. One of the very best immune boosting substances is raw milk of any form - good luck in finding that and why is that? Fermented foods of any source is also excellent. For it is your guts that send out the signal for the white Tcells to mass and if the guts have been compromised, well that's bad.

Timp
South Jordan, UT

Dr. Dillon doesn't know what he's talking about.. This tragic case shouldn't be to used scare up the masses about someone dying from the flu. This poor kid had staph bacteremia (staph in the blood). That kills young previously healthy people all the time. It has been reported that there was an outbreak of staph in the lockerroom which is a common occurence. That is the story.

Rosebyanyothername
Home Town USA, UT

My mother had the flu around Thanksgiving and passed away two weeks later in 1995. Her death certificate said she had sepsis, or staph as the cause. She was diabetic as well. We lost her three days after she went to the hospital. There wasn't anything more that could have been done differently. The doctors did all that was possible. She must have had some pneumonia set in as the medical staff tried to drain the fluid in her lungs at least once. It was very painful for her to go through that procedure. She was 77 at the time. It was a complete shock to lose her so quickly.

I offer condolences to Parker's family at this time. May you all find peace through this trying time for all of you. He looks like an outstanding young man without guile. May he rest in peace.

Mary E Petty
Sandy, UT

Yes, the story here is the staph infection. As I read about Parker, I kept wondering what kind did he have and what did they treat it with/how? We had a loved one get hospital-acquired MRSA in the heart following open heart surgery that they treated experimentally with Daptomycin. He survived multiple months in the hospital and multiple surgeries to repair the damage. We have shared his experience with countless in order to help others be proactive. We could all learn a lot from what happened to Parker because this virulent staph infection has now moved into the general population as community- acquired MRSA. It is infecting locker rooms and gyms and other public settings so we are seeing such unexpected deaths as his. We need to become proactive about staph infections in our daily lives. More must be done to educate the public and how to prevent staph (starting with: wash your hands). We need more R and D to give us the tools to beat MRSA and staph infections. For more information check out the MRSA Survivors Network and get involved.

CHS 85
Sandy, UT

My wife had full-blown influenza last year that turned into pneumonia and a blood infection. She was hospitalized for over a week, and was sick after that for a month. It wasn't the influenza that almost killed her, it was the blood infection.

Yes, she had gotten a flu shot, but only a week before she contracted influenza - not enough time for the immunization to become fully effective.

Owl
Salt Lake City, UT

The comment on MRSA is important, but not all MRSA infections are nosocomial (hospital acquired). Athletes are often indiscriminately given antibiotics for turf burns and other skin conditions. In the NFL this resulted in increased MRSA on players and in training rooms.

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