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Comments about ‘What foreign adoption bans mean for would-be parents’

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Published: Monday, Jan. 28 2013 10:03 a.m. MST

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Mukkake
Salt Lake City, UT

[“Because the supply of infants has dropped dramatically, childless couples find themselves going for what’s left: the kids who are at risk,” said University of Guelph psychology professor Michael Grand in an interview with Budak. “These are not the kids who have been traditionally chosen first.”]

So we have a rising middle class in developing countries who more likely to adopt children locally and an increased likelihood that older children in developed countries will now be adopted?

Sounds like a good thing all around. And people say the world is getting worse?

K
Mchenry, IL

Supply of children? Adoption is about finding a family for a child without attachment to parents or relatives. Not about childless couples. And you can have bio children and still be eligible to adopt depending on how many kids are in the home.

All the kids adopted abroad are also in the governments care. Not much different from domestic situation. People adopting internationally are chosing to parent kids with known concerns like alcohol use during pregnancy or complete unknown history. Some are fostered similar to the US but most are institutionally cared for. That often causes delays. Parents aren't adopting newborns abroad but children between 1 and 5 years. Some with known medical issues.

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