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Comments about ‘Mormon Parenting: Where did we come from?’

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Published: Friday, Jan. 25 2013 5:00 a.m. MST

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sharrona
layton, UT

RE:God's statement to Jeremiah that he knew him before he had formed him "in the belly" and "before he came forth out of the womb" (Jeremiah 1:5).

Before I formed you in the womb I knew [and] approved of you [as My chosen instrument], and before you were born I separated and set you apart, consecrating you; [and] I appointed you as a prophet to the nations. (Jer 1:5 AB)
The spiritual did not come first, but the natural, and after that the spiritual. (1Cor 15:46 NIV)

Modern translations are helpful. Jeremiah is not referring to pre-existence but the foreknowledge of God. Before Jeremiah was born . God knew he would become a prophet.

@ And while no other church teaches it, many individuals believe they lived before birth because of personal experiences.
Platonism, Plato believed in the pre-existence of the soul, which tied in with his innatism. He thought that we are born with knowledge from a previous life that is subdued at birth and must be relearned. This theory is similar to reincarnation, though there are differences.

A Scientist
Provo, UT

"Of the 500 or so Christian denominations, how many have doctrines that contemplate a premortal existence? - One."

Nonsense.

In the wake of the neoplatonism of Augustine, Dionysius, Origen and others, there have been countless Christian groups believing in a "pre-earth life".

More importantly, belief in a premortal existence is not necessarily anything to brag about, as most doctrines that invoke such a thing have been shown to be problematically deterministic.

And those who invoke the idea seem to conveniently do so as part of their "fore-ordination" arguments to justify their power and privilege in this mortal life. For instance, the idea has been used to justify denying priesthood to certain racial groups (because they were "uncommitted" in the premortal life), as well as to enforce the otherwise arbitrary authority of people claiming to have been "pre-ordained" to be in power or wealth.

It really isn't a very good doctrine when you think about it.

Twin Lights
Louisville, KY

A Scientist,

Perhaps there are Christian denominations that contemplate a pre-earth life but I have yet to come across them. Not the same as none of course.

Foreordination in the LDS sense does not justify power or privilege. Rather it speaks to whether and how we will meet the opportunities we are presented with here in this life. It is not deterministic. All depends on agency and choice.

LValfre
CHICAGO, IL

@Twin Lights

"Foreordination in the LDS sense does not justify power or privilege. Rather it speaks to whether and how we will meet the opportunities we are presented with here in this life. It is not deterministic. All depends on agency and choice."

Correction: It is not deterministic since 1978. Today it depends on agency and choice.

Twin Lights
Louisville, KY

LaValfe,

No, even before 1978. At least according to the black family in my ward then.

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