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Comments about ‘Wright Words: Could the WITMIT experiment work for you?’

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Published: Tuesday, Jan. 22 2013 5:00 a.m. MST

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DR Hampton
Portage, MI

I'm confident that WITMIT is the principle followed by Pres. Monson, Nephi (1 Ne 4:6), and most church leaders and parents. It's still helpful to have a "To Do" list, and is essential to pray about it. True principles are constantly rediscovered. This is one of them.

L
Central, Utah

The title caught my eye and reading it became elevated to my important things do do as part of reading the morning paper. Sharing a thought has gained equal status.

Once upon a time I was a Division Chief in our office. I received a memo from the State Office saying something had to be accomplished right away. There was no way we could do that along with the other "high priority" jobs so I went in to counsel with my boss. After listing he asked who signed the memo and promptly tore it in pieces. When I asked why, he responded that if it had really been important the State Director would have signed it, not an "underling." He went on to say that if it was really important that he would get a call from the State Director asking for an explaination of why it hadn't been done. Actually, we never did receive a follow-up request and the old outfit is still going.

L
Central, Utah

Another instance I remember is after taking the company time-mananagement course I would sit down before I went home and make my to-do list for tomorrow. I would rank them A,B & C.
Then I would rank the A's as 1,2 & 3.

I would leave with the determination to start on th A1 first thing. I would get there and the phone would ring and I was to come to the boss's office. He told me that he really needed to have XXX done. My A1's got delayed, maybe not even started.

I became more and more flustrated with making the priorities on my to-do list, until I discovered that if I put "Check with the boss for his priorities" as my A1 task and my A2 was then "Get busy doing them." I ended up getting a lot more of my A1 tasks done. I guess I was not very good at setting my own priorities, or at least some appeared more important to me than they did to the boss. Seems like he was happy with that arrangement too and he got a lot of his A1 jobs done. WITMIT in action.

Danny Chipman
Lehi, UT

I had a very similar thought yesterday as I was loading the washing machine with load number 8. I thought to myself, "With so many modern conveniences, why is it there never seems to be enough time? Time for family, time for relaxation, time for enrichment and education, time for service, time to get more than one area of the house clean...?"

Our priorities change, I guess. There are only 24 hours in a day. There have only ever been 24 hours in a day and there will only ever be 24 hours in a day.

To everything there is a season.

raybies
Layton, UT

Great Article. I've been complaining about how distracted I've been lately at pretty much everything I need to do these days. It doesn't matter if it's work or at home, I just seem to want to do the complete opposite of whatever it is I need to do. Oh to have this wicked spirit rooted out of me. ;) Anyhow, I really appreciated this perspective. I love simple ways of thinking. Not that doing it is simple, but keeping a simple positive approach to the things I have to do will really help me focus. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. Good luck on your WITMITs. :)

sharrona
layton, UT

To: DR Hampton I'm confident that WITMIT is the principle followed by Pres. Monson, Nephi (1 Ne 4:6), and most church leaders and parents. It's still helpful to have a "To Do" list, and is essential to pray about it. True principles are constantly rediscovered.

Be like,…The Berean Jews were of more noble character than those in Thessalonica, for they received the message with great eagerness and examined the Scriptures every day to see if what Paul said was true(Acts 17:11 NIV)

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