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Comments about ‘Weight victimization: Bullying often comes from parents, study says’

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Published: Monday, Jan. 14 2013 6:00 a.m. MST

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rnoble
Pendleton, OR

I have some serious questions about the definition of bullying in this and some other studies. What a parent does to add motivation on weight issues cannot be termed bullying automatically just because the child does not appreciate it. I would sincerely hope that the cajoling(teasing?) being done by parents would be accompanied by other support and this article does not address whether that was the norm or not or even if other parental support was present. Since the study was done with kids at "fat" camp, I think parents must have been supporting in other ways and the child was just not liking the pressure.

Midvaliean
MIDVALE, UT

I hate to say this, but losing weight is not a mystery. Any dietitian can show you how to lost 3 healthy pounds a week. It takes discipline. And if your kids are fat, it's because you don't know how to feed them.
LEARN about food and how it works in your body. Pass the information onto your kids. If you are in shape and a kid is fat, tell them how to get thin and work with them. Plenty of info out there on how to do this. #1... STOP WITH SUGAR. I'll let you go from there.
In a nutshell fat kids = parents problem. I feel for those kids who are robbed of nutritional information because of the ignorance of their parents.

raybies
Layton, UT

If I have five kids, we share mealtimes and one is overweight... exactly how do I not know how to feed them? Do I give the fat kid celery, and the rest the main meal?

Weight is individual, and even in families, the battle is often not as simple as "You're just eating too much sugar".

But then i suspect those who claim such are really just bullies who've grown older.

VA Saint
Chester, VA

Well said, Raybies. Those who believe that it's a matter of "eating too much sugar" or other supposed dietary choices, they are misinformed.

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