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Comments about ‘Cold, haze provide dramatic look at air challenges’

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Published: Friday, Jan. 4 2013 8:40 p.m. MST

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worf
Mcallen, TX

Our country has cleaner air, because factories have gone to other places.

AmPatriot
Taylorsville, UT

Pollution is definitely not from people working in good paying jobs, the pollution now is from fast food restaurants and kitchen exhaust fans bellowing out their cooking oils which are sulfuric in nature. Fast food is our only industry so its time to put more controls on the food industry and limit the number per block in the downtown area.

Or they can always install fans blowing down state street and the freeway parking lots or they can depopulate the downtown of its overdeveloped and haven illegal communities in the downtown.

Haze is a natural state, cooking oil acidic exhausts are not.

Impressive photo fabrication and special effects to make the air look yellow like volcanic eruption about to happen.

one old man
Ogden, UT

Do we really want to go back to the days before the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts? I'm old enough to remember those days.

Or would it be a better idea to find ways to keep our air clean and prevent American jobs from being shipped overseas by big corporations seeking labor at slave wages?

I'm afraid that if some people have their way, we will wind up reverting back to what India and China are like. Is that what we REALLY want?

Dektol
Powell, OH

Haze? Nothing like trying to ignore reality - SMOG is the name. Air Pollution. Poisonous breathing conditions! I talking with friends still trapped in Utah it is apparent the smog is hurting many of your residents. It is not "haze" guys, haze doesn't poison the respiratory system.

one old man
Ogden, UT

Dektol, I'm not sure where Powell Ohio is located, but I grew up in Hiram in northeastern Ohio back in the 50's and 60's when the Cuyahoga River regularly caught fire in downtown Cleveland. When I was a young pilot, I once followed a cloud of red dust from the steel mills in Youngstown and Cleveland to the south to see how far they went. It was a cold, clear winter day -- except for the red haze -- and I followed it clear into Kentucky and it was still going. Finally had to turn back so I could be on the ground before dark.

The Cuyahoga was so foul that it filled the entire Cleveland harbor inside the breakwall with a montage of various colors. They flowed out through the openings in the breakwall and extented about five miles into Lake Erie. The sludge completely surrounded the "crib" that is Cleveland's drinking water intake about a mile offshore. Even after extensive treatment, Cleveland's water was very tasty.

And to think there are people foolish enough to want to go back to that.

Screwdriver
Casa Grande, AZ

See there, listen to One old man, the past is not always better thanks to progressives. BTW what were you flying?

I use the smoke stacks of the Winslow Az coal plant since I can see them from 100 miles. I used to fly my Commanche 250 all over the place. Coal plants are Great for navigation - not great for mercury in the air and water.

The air around Phoenix has become very scummy and you don't really notice until you go flying.

But lately I've just been flying lower and even slower powered parachutes. I may look for a J3 or Champ.

majmajor
Layton, UT

I respectfully disagree with a couple above posts. Most studies show that the number-one air pollution issue isn't burned grease from fast-food, coal power plants, or even the oil refineries. Most of the bad air comes out of our cars tail-pipes, and Wasatch Front air has become worse over the last 10-20 years because we have a million more people living here and most are driving cars.

I don't like most government regulations, but the Clean Air Act is a good thing. I don't think that the Feds. can or should further tighten the standards. I would propose the idea of a State pollution tax, the worse a vehicle pollutes the more the owner pays every year when he registers it.

The only negative is that the poor potentially pay more taxes, but it would do a better job in getting clunkers off the road than the Federal's cash-for-clunkers program and make more money available for the schools.

They could call it the "Clunkers Lottery." ;)

one old man
Ogden, UT

Screwdriver -- congratulations on being able to afford to continue to fly. I had to give it up after 9/11's paranoia tripled the cost.

I soloed a J-3 in 1957. The flight I wrote about was in a Taylorcraft BC-12D. My cross-country flights as a student were in Champs. Heck, I had about 200 hours before I ever flew anything that didn't drag its tail. Now you need a special rating to fly one of those things.

I had a ride in a PPC, and loved it. But now I can't find one that has an N-number and don't want to spend money on something I can only fly alone. Half the fun of flying is sharing it with other people.

Sometime I'll have to tell you the story of the day I couldn't land at Farmington, NM because emissions from the new Four Corners power plant had dropped visibility below VFR minimums. But that was before the Clean Air Act.

Fly safe. And fly happy!

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