Quantcast

Comments about ‘4 BYU alumni among 100 senators in upcoming 113th U.S. Congress’

Return to article »

Published: Thursday, Jan. 3 2013 5:25 p.m. MST

Comments
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
IA Cougar
West Des Moines, IA

Crapo...did he attend in the years of Jim McMahon? Kidding. Too bad he enters this term with so much to be thinking about other than government. That is a sad story, in my opinion.

sls
Columbia, MO

Bloomberg News reports that U.S. Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Arizona) is also a BYU graduate, although she probably tries to avoid mentioning it as much as possible.

Rep. Labrador's first name is Raul, not Ral. He was nominated as Speaker of the House and received one vote for that position.

activ2004
Clearfield, UT

Taking into consideration where the world, especially the USA, is at today, I conclude it best to not have so many 'educated', elite, out of touch individuals in government.

Y_is_for_Yale
Salt Lake City, UT

They may be in "impressive company" (i.e. Harvard and Yale), but they are all so very unimpressive people. Maybe Utah should think about electing someone who wasn't educated at Provo U. I know that Idaho will be shortly...

dimelo
PEYTON, CO

Considering the level of corruption in the US government, and
especially in Congress, it seems, at best, ill-advised to be bragging
about high representation there. Does the DN realize that the approval
rating for Congress has rightly varied between 10% and 20%
recently--at all-time lows? A very reasonable case could be made for
even a much lower approval rating given the job performance.

I guess that is why many are called and few chosen in what really
matters (not positions in Congress by the way), as they seek the
things of this world and the honors of men, above all else including
proper governance—governance on behalf of the people instead of their
own selfish interests. If anything describes the current Congress it
is blatant self-interest (selfishness and greed).

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments