Comments about ‘Mayan calendar aside, end times theology has meaning for many Americans’

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Published: Wednesday, Dec. 19 2012 6:55 p.m. MST

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Hutterite
American Fork, UT

This 'end of days' stuff puts religion in perspective. It's all a fabrication.

Blue
Salt Lake City, UT

"The most fervent believers in end-times theology are white evangelical Protestants, the PRRI survey indicated. "

They also don't accept the science of evolution, the geologically established age of the Earth, the cosmologically established age of the universe, or the science confirming the role of humans in global warming.

In short - they use their religious beliefs as a shield against reality.

So much for The Enlightenment.

Tekakaromatagi
Dammam, Saudi Arabia

If I die tomorrow, that is my "end of days."

Emajor
Ogden, UT

These numbers are appalling. This world has been around for over 4 billion years and a significant number of people in richest, most powerful nation on earth believe that the world is going to end within their brief lifetime? Because an ancient book of mythology vaguely suggests it might?

procuradorfiscal
Tooele, UT

Re: "A recent poll showed just 2 percent of Americans believe the myth . . . ."

So, something like 6 million Americans actually believe the world, as we know it, is ending tomorrow? What a gullible breed!

But even worse are those that ridicule anyone who likes to be prepared for rough times that will certainly come.

They appear convinced that, notwithstanding the constant political, geological, meteorological, cultural, and personal change that characterizes Earth's history, we're fools for being concerned about hard times.

Their approach? Let the government worry about it.

Yeah -- that always works so well.

Like Katrina or Sandy.

A Scientist
Provo, UT

Here is some perspective.

Doctrine and Covenants 87:6
"And thus, with the sword and by bloodshed the inhabitants of the earth shall mourn; and with famine, and plague, and earthquake, and the thunder of heaven, and the fierce and vivid lightning also, shall the inhabitants of the earth be made to feel the wrath, and indignation, and chastening hand of an Almighty God, until the consumption decreed hath made a full end of all nations;"

The LDS Bible Dictionary states:

"The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the kingdom of God on the earth, but is at the present limited to an ecclesiastical kingdom. During the millennial era, the kingdom of God will be both political and ecclesiastical, and will have worldwide jurisdiction in political realms when the Lord has made a full end of all nations (D&C 87:6)."

D&C 1:14:
"and the day cometh that they who will not hear the voice of the Lord, neither the voice of his servants, neither give heed to the words of the prophets and apostles, shall be cut off..."

World domination and expulsion of nonbelievers... Not a very positive view of "the end".

Mukkake
Salt Lake City, UT

procuradorfiscal:
[But even worse are those that ridicule anyone who likes to be prepared for rough times that will certainly come.]

Because it is ridiculous. Where do you draw the line? Some people "prepare for the worst" by keeping a flashlight handy. Others build bomb shelters and waste their children's time teaching them how to survive in the woods with only a knife.

I'm sure you think your approach is practical, whatever it is, but even if you have a full "72 hour kit", it ends up being useless around hour 73+ (unless you knew in advance that the "hard times" were gonna last longer and rationed accordingly, which is rarely the case).

If you really wanna talk about preparation, are you ready to make the hard decisions like so many others have? When all the food is gone for everybody, and there's nothing left to steal? When all the animals, domesticated and wild, have been eaten, and the only meat left is obtained under... suspicious circumstances?

Preppers live in a fantasy world, thinking they're gonna be prepared for everything that could happen.

I'd rather spend my time enjoying the good times and planning for more.

procuradorfiscal
Tooele, UT

Re: "I'd rather spend my time enjoying the good times and planning for more."

I'd mention the old Aesop story about the grasshopper and the ants, but liberal educators don't teach wisdom like that anymore, so you probably have never heard of it.

So, I'll just say, good luck with your grasshopper attitude. We all hope it works out for 'ya [but we also know it won't].

When hard times hit, we'll all [including you] give thanks for the millions of ants out there busily, anonymously, thanklessly storing up wherewithal to deal with the ensuing want.

xscribe
Colorado Springs, CO

Pocuradorfiscal says: So, something like 6 million Americans actually believe the world, as we know it, is ending tomorrow? "What a gullible breed!"

Then says: But even worse are those that ridicule anyone who likes to be prepared for rough times that will certainly come.

So you are going to ridicule 6 million Americans, and then chastize others who do the same? Nice!

procuradorfiscal
Tooele, UT

Re: "So you are going to ridicule 6 million Americans, and then chastize others who do the same?"

Sure. I'll ridicule any of that gullible breed [I seriously doubt the number is 6 million -- but then again, there are a lot who believe demonstrably false liberal fairy tales] who, supported by only a fatuous interpretation of the flimsiest, most tenuous evidence, have foolishly fixed tomorrow as their date with doom.

But, of course, that doesn't mean there is no evidence of rough times ahead.

History proves that inter-catastrophic periods always end.

Always.

Deniers of that fact are living in a dangerous la-la land.

But, what I have the hardest time with is someone that insists on ridiculing those of us who feel most secure hoping and planning for the best, but preparing for the worst.

Who are we hurting? No one.

Who are we willing to help? You.

Mukkake
Salt Lake City, UT

procuradorfiscal:
[I'd mention the old Aesop story about the grasshopper and the ants, but liberal educators don't teach wisdom like that anymore, so you probably have never heard of it.]

I'm sure I have, thanks to PBS, but I do know I've heard of "Chicken Little".

Half full; half empty. You can find a fable/myth/parable to match either point of view.

I'm just gonna keep working to build the world I want live in, not the one I fear of leaving in. Then again, I've always been suspicious that the "sky is falling" crowd are doing the same, and want to live in some post-disaster scenario, because they dislike this one for whatever reason, feel powerless, and want a world that matches their own ideals and where they can feel empowered in such a scenario.

Like I said, the "ants" are planning for a scenarios that they believe they can handle, not the ones they can't/won't handle, like necessary cannibalism.

I really don't care for either scenario, and would rather plan for scenarios that include the furthering of civilization, technology, and standard of living.

xscribe
Colorado Springs, CO

Just trying to get a grasp of your personality, and I think I know what it is!

Anti Bush-Obama
Washington, DC

I almost hope the world would end with all this anti-gun rhetoric and attack on idividualism.

Ernest T. Bass
Bountiful, UT

It's almost stunning how many educated people believe in the myths of our bronze-age ancestors. Both creation and end times myths.

Red
Salt Lake City, UT

The wise will know when the signs of the times are happening. Just like we can tell when spring is upon by watching the leaves of an olive tree.

It is best to be prepared spiritually.

Maybe a little self reflection will do us all good. Are we really treating each other the way we should?

Let's love life and enjoy every day!

JSB
Sugar City, ID

The early Christians thought the Second Coming was coming in their lifetimes. In “The Name of the Rose” medieval monks anticipated the Second Coming very soon.

In Whittier’s poem “Abraham Davenport” about a colonial legislator who in response to people’s fears that the end had come because of an ominous storm and that they should adjourn their legislative session, said:

"This well may be
The Day of Judgment which the world awaits;
But be it so or not, I only know
My present duty, and my Lord's command
To occupy till He come. So at the post
Where He hast set me in His providence,
I choose, for one, to meet Him face to face,
No faithless servant frightened from my task,
But ready when the Lord of the harvest calls;
And therefore, with all reverence, I would say,
Let God do His work, we will see to ours.
Bring in the candles." And they brought them in.

Whatever else is happening, whatever “signs” we are seeing, our duty is to “bring in the candles” and keep striving to bless the lives of our fellow man.

Joe Moe
Logan, UT

@ A Scientist (8:32 a.m.) If you knew the LDS Doctrine as well as you portray, then you would know that your conclusion is false. The LDS understanding of the millennium involves not only zero violence, but zero compulsion. The "domination" you fret about is not a violent overthrow of nations, but a gathering of the willing, after calamity and destruction. There's no reason to criticize it, because if (a) it's a myth, then no worries, or (b) it comes true, it will be utopia.

Justmythoughts
Provo, UT

I wish the world would end tomorrow. No Obama care, fiscal cliff, gun control, etc. etc. It can't come fast enough for me.

VST
Bountiful, UT

As an actively involved LDS member, I have no idea when the millennial era will begin, but I am pretty certain, it will not be tomorrow. In fact, at my age, I doubt it will happen before I pass through this mortal existence (hopefully several more years from now). There are just too many signs that have not occurred and too many unfulfilled prophecies to be completed.

But this much I do know. There will eventually be an ending and a commencement of a millennial era where the Savior will personally reign upon this terrestrially changed earth.

Side Notes to my belief/knowledge repertoire:

1. Evolution within life-forms has occurred (scientific knowledge that I accept). But I also know, that spiritually and physically, I am a descendant of Adam and Eve (spiritual confirmation).

2. Geologically, the age of this Earth is about 4.5 billion years old (scientific knowledge).

3. The age of this Universe is approximately 13.8 billion years old (scientific knowledge).

Am I enlightened? I could care less about that answer.

A Scientist
Provo, UT

Joe Moe

False conclusion? It is in black and white in your own scriptures.

"The LDS understanding of the millennium involves not only zero violence, but zero compulsion."

"...with the sword and by bloodshed" and nonbelievers will be "cast out"? Sounds like compulsion and violence to me.

That it is a myth (or a false prophecy) is not the problem. It is that those who believe it manifest an arrogance and take actions that strive for self-fulfilling prophecy that is concerning. History gives us ample evidence of the harm, damage, and violence resulting from delusions of grandeur and fascist ideology.

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