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Comments about ‘High school pathways could speed kids to graduation’

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Published: Friday, Dec. 7 2012 9:42 p.m. MST

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worf
Mcallen, TX

Half our colleges students are in need of remedial classes. Let's not speed kids to graduation.

My2Cents
Taylorsville, UT

Career goals? Who's career goals? Those of the educations system to speed them out of the class room by goals established for the poverty jobs of Utah businesses? Or should our students be better prepared to tackle some more challenging and enjoyable careers of the students choices and abilities?

This business and education relationship of joint collaboration has proven to be a failure and its time to kick this elaboration and put students into a pure education system without any career goals which limiting their knowledge input. Its foolish to deny our children all the education they can get in all subject matter. Every class and subject has the greatest diverse potential of discovery that every student should at least experience.

To put a student out of school before they have all the infromation is given to them is the mark of incompetence and insulting act an educator can bestow on these young minds.

If they need more class room, kick the illegal aliens out of the schools, they are dead weight and wasting our time and funds since they are of no benefit to this country or our society.

wazzup??
Provo, UT

Why do team sports always get the shaft when it comes to these issues? The fact of the matter is that students should be treated no differently from wanting to take band than wanting to play basketball. These are students! One is not greater than the other as far as scholarship opportunities in college nor for careers! All extra curricular actvities - by certified teachers should be considered a viable option for credit! if you force too many activities after school, facilities aren't able to accommodate the load. C'mon state leaders, think more clearly and not reactively! I like the pathway options to help ambitious students the option to focus on what matters to them and be free of what does not. The article's examples are clear.

John C. C.
Payson, UT

My2Cents, despite your horrible statement against immigrants I agree with you about the value of general education. We educate future parents, voters, leaders and innovators. We also need citizens who can adapt to the quickly changing economic landscape. Many of today's graduates will retire from careers that don't yet exist.

We don't need assembly-line schools.

Case in point: The U.S.S.R graduated more and better engineers than the U.S. throughout the cold war and space race years. What kept our technology superior? A broader vision of education. Russian engineers had been intensively trained on according to the highest state-of-the-art technology available. "...However, the more flexible, theoretical, broader-based higher education system in the United States may produce specialists with an ability to innovate, with an ability to adapt to technological change, and with greater latitude for interfield mobility as the demands of the economy change." In other words the Russians learned existing technology while the Americans built the next technology.

(This quote from a study done for the commission that wrote the "Nation at Risk" report in 1983, ostensibly to bash our schools.)

Keep our education broad and liberal.

junkgeek
Agua Dulce, TX

Terrible idea.

If you want to improve education, start by cutting some of the electives. Every kid should have 4 years of math, science, social studies, and English. You can offer honors and basic levels.

Get rid of seminary during the day. Make it early-morning, like the rest of the church.

You can "assembly-line" kids into their futures by offering fewer options. Darn it, that's how their parents did it!

RBB
Sandy, UT

While some children need remedial education, you also have a lot of high school students who are just wasting time and are bored. There are students who are interested in going into math or the sciences that have taken the top class their school has to offer by their sophomore or junior years. They either have to drop the subject for a couple of years or leave school to travel to the closest college campus for part of the day.

With the availability of on line classes, many kids can comfortably graduate high school by the time they are juniors. Why not help those kids move on - especially when many are planning on graduate degrees that will take 6-8 years after high school. We need to move beyond seat time and focus on competency instead.

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