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Comments about ‘'Mormon girls' poke fun at Utah names in YouTube video’

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Published: Monday, Dec. 10 2012 5:00 a.m. MST

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CB
Salt Lake City, UT

This is great! And I thought I had a problem with my name (Cheryl) while growing up (1940's)

Lasvegaspam
Henderson, NV

Ooops, BigBopper, a sore spot was obviously hit. However, I must add that Vernal, where you write from, has that same Utah-sounding twang which causes people to say it out loud in funny ways! Nothing personal; it’s just the way it is.

Just as your choice of using the phrase “my word” reveals something about you, so does your asking, “What about the traditions of taking part of each of the parent’s names to name a child?” Are you surprised that both are foreign to someone like me who was born and raised in Chicago? The point is that the world is larger than Vernal OR Utah.

Good for you to not make fun of a name given by a loving parent; however, the world will and does! One does a disservice to a child when one saddles him/her with a colloquial-type name. FYI, colloquialism means local or regional dialect. (Example: At the grocery store Utahns will ask if you’d like your items in a “sack”. Everywhere else the word “bag” is used.)

Lasvegaspam
Henderson, NV

Ooops, BigBopper, a sore spot was obviously hit. However, I must add that Vernal, where you write from, has that same Utah-sounding twang which causes people to say it out loud in funny ways! Nothing personal; it’s just the way it is.

Just as your choice of using the phrase “my word” reveals something about you, so does your asking, “What about the traditions of taking part of each of the parent’s names to name a child?” Are you surprised that both are foreign to someone like me who was born and raised in Chicago? The point is that the world is larger than Vernal OR Utah.

Good for you to not make fun of a name given by a loving parent; however, the world will and does! One does a disservice to a child when one saddles him/her with a colloquial-type name. FYI, colloquialism means local or regional dialect. (Example: At the grocery store Utahns will ask if you’d like your items in a “sack”. Everywhere else I’ve ever lived, the word “bag” is used.)

Phillip M Hotchkiss
Malta, Mt

You can say that again lasvegaspam

Allen
Salt Lake valley, UT

I knew a guy named Donald Duckworth. He changed his name to Peter.

anti-liar
Salt Lake City, UT

To some here, of course people shouldn't make fun of or roll their eyes at others' names. The problem is that we are not in a perfect world and some will do it anyway. This is why naming a girl "Abraham" is such an ill-advised idea.

MA in MD
FROSTBURG, MD

Uh, no ... these are a burden to a child, but not as bad as the ones that come from the inner city neighborhoods of Baltimore!

Mom of 8
Hyrum, UT

When I lived in Virginia I saw a lot of strange names, too, unfortunately because parents were only semi-literate. One checker at a grocery store had the name of "Chasity" on her badge, but it was pronounced "Chastity."

She insisted the rest of the world didn't know how to spell the word right, not her parents.

We purposely made sure none of our children have names that begin with a "Mc" or a K, or named them after cities.

Perhaps we need to resurrect good solid old-fashioned names, like Walter and Ethyl . . .

Mike in Sandy
Sandy, UT

Names aside---I speak of usage, grammar, sentence structure and syntax---- I have never seen the butchering of the English language as rampant as it is here in Utah.

Wonder
Provo, UT

Another Utahism -- "oh my heck."

Allen
Salt Lake valley, UT

@Lasvegaspam

Colloquialism really is regional, as you said. Your example of a sack/bag is a good example, because in West Virginia those things are called pokes.

If parents choose to give a child a strange name with weird spelling, that is their choice. I may think their choices are strange and funny, but I will never say anything to their child. Friendships are based on human relations not on the names we were given. My given name has the spelling of a surname not of a given name, because I was named after my great grandmother, Martha Allen. If people spell my name Alan or Allan, that's fine with me. They are conditioned to use the common spelling while I was given a different spelling. A similar situation exists with my surname of Leigh. My family pronounces it lay while the traditional pronunciation is lee. As long as I know they are referring to me, I don't care how they pronounce it. (I used to correct people until I had a math teacher at USU who ignored my corrections and continued to call me lee. After my experiences with her, I realized her pronunciation was not important)

Brent Walton
GIG HARBOR, WA

I am not a girl, but I've always wondered why my name was so concentrated in Utah. Every other Brent I've known also had Utah roots.

SLC gal
Salt Lake City, UT

It's not a "Utah" thing. It's a US thing. Am I the only one who thinks it's a little obnoxious that these girls are running around making fun of UT when they're not really Utahns?

holly56
LOVELAND, CO

Bwahahaha! My given name is HOLLIS!!! But I'm 56 years old... LOL

NedGrimley
Brigham City, UT

I've never, in my 57 years, had anyone ask me if I wanted my items in a sack. "paper or plastic" maybe. And then I just told them I don't use credit cards...

Dr H
LAYTON, UT

I think our modern Western culture is perhaps the first in history to give their children sounds for names, instead of a word that actually means something significant. Native American names like Sitting Bull, etc carried special meanings, just as ancient Israelite names did (ie, Jesus wasn't named that because it sounded cute, rather because the name literally means 'Jehovah saves' in Hebrew). Our Western culture used to name its children after ancestors or other individuals who might serve as role models. It's a pity that we have now turned to labeling our children forever with cute sounds, like McKayla and a thousand other names that have no meaning whatsoever. A name can be such a significant thing that it's a shame to waste such an opportunity. My name is David, which means 'beloved' in Hebrew and is of course the name of one of the greatest Bible heroes. That has been an inspiration to me since I was old enough to learn about the Biblical David. Too bad so many kids will never have that kind of legacy.

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