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Comments about ‘BYU students invent new night baby monitor, win competition at school’

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Published: Monday, Dec. 3 2012 4:10 p.m. MST

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sisucas
San Bernardino, CA

This is horrible news. Pulse oximeters are so finicky. Even the ones that are high tech adn maintain close skin contact give false readings all the time. For every one kid it benefits 1000 are going to get false alarms. Parents are going to be unable to sleep and will fill up the ER in the middle of the night with unsolvable concerns about a baby who's comfortable, cheerful and looks great but who's alarm is going off. I actually did reserach with these in medical school. We'd put one on each fingers, alter our breathing and wiggle our fingers and watch how they all went wacky. The reporting is also delayed enough even in the high grade medical ones that you should really wait at least 30 seconds before you trust them. Please don't put this on the shelf at Babies-R-Us!!!!

Wendall Hoop
Salt Lake City, UT

did you do any market research. I would never put that on my baby. they would hate it. Here's a big sock/boot to put on your foot...? what?! nice invention but it won't sell.

Gail Fitches
Layton, UT

I think this will save a lot of lives. It reminds me of the oximeter that measures oxygen levels and heart rates, that have an alarm, that I have for my Father. This is a great invention. This may prevent babies dying from SIDs and monitor babies that have health issues.

omni scent
taylorsville, UT

We took home our pre-mature son home with a big, bulky pulse oximeter. We had to strap on the sensor to his foot every night. Although inconvienent, I think it saved our boy a couple times his O2 got low. This new package looks much more convienent with less wires and bulk. Thanks for doing the market research. Great invention, it should sell tons!

Aggielove
Cache county, USA

Then your babies are touchy. Ours would be just fine.

rogerdpack2
Orem, UT

Looks great (a few other products like it exists, like the "snuza"). I would suggest they do a kickstarter and market the thing! I would contribute :)

Johnny Triumph
American Fork, UT

This is a great idea! And to all the naysayers here, this isn't the final product and I'm sure it will have design tweaks and more unit testing and studies done. Great idea that will help in the long run!

jsucese
,

I think that this product can go beyond children, what about making it for Alzheimers patients or other dementia related diseases. This invention has some major implications that could take this idea to bigger markets, just need to find the right capital. Good luck guys!

AZnewser
Snowflake, AZ

"I actually did reserach with these in medical school. We'd put one on each fingers, alter our breathing and wiggle our fingers and watch how they all went wacky. The reporting is also delayed enough even in the high grade medical ones that you should really wait at least 30 seconds before you trust them."

I use pulse oximetry on sedated children regularly in my office... I find it to be very accurate. The response is of course slightly delayed, and children desaturate very quickly, but it is technology that preserves life.

stubifier
Kearns, UT

@sisucas

Horrible news? I'll tell you what's horrible news: waking up to find a dead baby. Maybe the product won't work well, maybe it shouldn't land on store shelves until the technology is better developed. But calling this "horrible news" is completely out of line when you consider that the device is trying to prevent what seems to me to be the DEFINITION of horrible news.

KinCO
Fort Collins, CO

Great idea! I have the feeling that some of these naysayers are well past the age of having babies in their homes (interesting that they are all men as well). I'm sure there will be tweaks needed, but a great concept!

BYUalum
South Jordan, UT

Sounds great! I have friends who had babies who died of SIDS. Their children would be alive today with this invention. I hope it is tested and then if it passes, sell it. I think there is a big market for this product.

JRJ
Pocatello, ID

Tell the Wright Brothers that it's stupid to try to fly. Good inventions begin with good ideas. Alexander Fleming must have been laughed at when he used 'moldy bread' to treat infections.

raybies
Layton, UT

my babies all had to wear hip-braces the first year of their lives for displacia, this is not that big a deal, and I agree it could potentially save lives. If anything it may enable researchers better insight into SIDS than what currently exists. And as the technology matures, so will the devices. And just think of how strong baby's legs will be hefting that device around.

Sure, you might get false alarms, but what new parent doesn't already respond to their own internal false alarms fifty times a day? I suspect the type of parent that needs this for their child will still be better off with it, just for the peace of mind it could bring.

RSLJAZZBYUUTAH
Syracuse, UT

Won't be accurate enough, as a person in the medical field, pulse ox readers are not accurate enough for heart rates, if you move it will throw the whole thing off, it will be ok for oxygen levels but not hear rate.

Nicholas DeWaal
,

This is great! When you get this rolling, can you provide these to the third world at a price no higher than production cost? The third world is suffering terribly from a high infant mortality rate. Hans Rosling has a TED presentation where he discusses the effect of infant mortality in the third world which goes to show how much this is needed in the third world at a low cost.

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