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Comments about ‘Residents, visitors pushing for name change of popular canyon near Moab’

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Published: Friday, Nov. 23 2012 3:24 p.m. MST

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THE MTN MAN
Taylorsville, UT

Just to add some perspective, I think this article should include a few historical points: "Negro Bill" was a half-white, half-black cowboy who lived in the area, and he was quite fond of his nickname (which, as noted, was actually the "N-word" back in those days). It wasn't derogatory towards him - it was what his friends called him.

That said, I understand that times have changed, and the word is offensive to some (and certainly awkward to many), and I have no problem if they change it.

watchman
Salt Lake City, UT

This seems to demonstrate over sensativity to the name 'Negro'. For many years in our history this was the common reference for black people. It was not intended to be demeaning or critical. The name for this canyon undoubtedly has historical meaning. To change the name appears to me to do more harm than good and probably demeans Negro Bill.

JT75
Garfield, UT

Has there ever been concern for chooing the name 'Moab' for a town? According to Genesis 19:30-38, Moab was the son of Lot by incest with his eldest daughter. She and her sister decided to continue their father's line through intercourse with their father. Lot got drunk to facilitate the deed and conceived Moab. And the Spanish word for black is offending folks?!

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