Comments about ‘Cooking turkey this Thankgiving? Don't wash that bird!’

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Published: Monday, Nov. 19 2012 12:20 p.m. MST

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A voice of Reason
Salt Lake City, UT

"rinsing... can spray juices and any bacteria already there as far as three feet, coating surfaces with an unseen mist of yuck"

That's why I rinse, and get the Bird to where it needs to be- THEN I clean the sink area and every where else.. and myself, etc. Once the Bird is 'a roastin' then I clean again if anywhere else could even remotely have been within a few feet of 'raw bird' before doing any other cooking. I also rinse anything in the sink with soapy water and put in the dishwasher before even touching anything else.

Yes, I'm paranoid- but because of that this article doesn't really help people like me. I'm not saying it's a bad point to bring up, quite the contrary. I'm just adding that washing is still important, just with precautions! :)

raybies
Layton, UT

But since it's thanksgiving, let's remember to be thankful and look on the bright side.

Sure, salomanella's a bad thing... unless you're on a weightloss program, and then all that loss of resolve is resolved by a loss of one's stomach contents in rapid order.

Red Headed Stranger
Billy Bobs, TX

Use a covered roaster. By all means use the thermometer to make sure, but the covered roaster keeps things as moist as moist as it can be. It also provides a huge margin of error as it cannot dry out.

tlaulu
Taylorsville, Utah

The article states that "Salmonella is a nasty bacteria. Most person infected with it developed diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps". I always thought diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps are caused by overeating. The poor salmonella bacteria has no room to breath in your system. So it's trying to escape from being choked in there.

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