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Comments about ‘A community matter: Child abuse results in human toll and economic burden to society’

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Published: Sunday, Sept. 30 2012 11:18 p.m. MDT

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DVD
Taylorsville, 00

From the article: "We ought to be encouraging businesses to create family friendly policies, and we ought to be questioning public leaders and social policies that impact children and families."

Employers that punish or fire workers for caring for their sick kids instead of allowing them to call in are not helping this issue at all.

We need more stringent and enforced laws that protect against this behavior by those in power.

NeilT
Clearfield, UT

A realtor friend pointed out that many foreclosured homes are trashed due to people becoming discouraged and just giving up. I agree with the above post. During the last recession To many financial institutions were to quick to force people out instead of exploring alternatives. Many foreclosures were illegal. Foreclosure should be a last resort when all other options have been exhausted. I can't imagine the stress that goes with being foreclosed on when it is due to unemployment, or other circumstances beyond the owners control.

Jim
Mesa, Az

Abusing a Child is like dropping a rock in a mill pond. The ripples reverberate throughout the entire community. The cost doesn't end with the investigation or legal proceedings, they continue of for the child for many many years. The true economic cost to the community is unknown.

sallys
clovis, CA

Uh huh. And no one talks about the real form of child abuse, which is separating your children from God. No one wants to talk about the parents who teach their children to rebel against righteousness. No one wants to talk about the government that takes the Bible out of the schools. No one wants to talk about the immeasurable price of a soul lost because no one took the time to teach a child that the Lord is mighty to save. Yeah. We have a child abuse problem. A real child abuse problem. And it's far worse than anything you can see in the flesh.

Nan BW
ELder, CO

The first line of defense for protection of children is to have stronger families. That means that we need to help teenagers recognize that having a baby too young and outside marriage is not cool and enviable. We need to help struggling families with emotional, physical and spiritual back-up. We all need to be involved by first doing all we can to support good principles within our own families, and then extend concern to friends, neighbors and anyone we see in danger of abuse and neglect. I wish I were doing more. Within my family, I am focused, but I know that far more is needed from each of us. We can all pray for all the children, and then act upon inspiration.

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