A trend that won't stop: Children run over by vehicles

Four-year-old boy OK after accident that happens once every seven days


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  • dragon12 Salt Lake City, UT
    Sept. 28, 2012 2:40 p.m.

    I wonder what demographics tell us . . . from personal experience, West Valley City children actually dare cars by fearlessly walking on or onto the road, acting totally entitled. It's baffling to me. Children on the east side or from nicer rural areas seem to care about their lives and remain on the sidewalk. Yes, I'd agree with other comments made that parenting is a big factor, if not the biggest factor, in attitude, educating children, and respect for the law, physics, and human life.

  • Aggielove Cache county, USA
    Sept. 28, 2012 2:10 p.m.

    This is pretty simple.
    Are you ready for this?.
    Moms need to Stop running around All day long...
    It never ends. Run run run.
    Never any down time to slow this life down.
    Pretty simple.

  • Say What? Bountiful, UT
    Sept. 28, 2012 11:13 a.m.

    If the govement gets involved, that's communism. Better dead than Red I always say.

  • Fern RL LAYTON, UT
    Sept. 28, 2012 10:39 a.m.

    Telling people to watch out for their own children is good, but while you're at it, tell drivers to be safe when other people's children are present as well. Tell them not to speed through parking lots, and not to pass a parked car, without stopping, near an entrance to the mall which prevents you from seeing who might be on the other side.

    As a young mother I struggled between not wanting to be a "helicopter mom" and wanting to help my children be safe. I thought if I could teach them to respond to voice commands the way you might train a dog, it would help. One thing I tried was a game I called "Stop and Go." We would hold hands and go when I said "Go" and stop when I said "Stop." We especially did this in the Mall parking lot. Once, with my four small children, one of my daughters ran energetically up the sidewalk to where a car was parked, then darted in front of it while another car was approaching speedily from behind. "Stop!" I yelled; and she stopped, thankfully, just before the car sped past.

  • Rifleman Salt Lake City, Utah
    Sept. 28, 2012 6:47 a.m.

    Re: Hutterite American Fork, UT
    "Parents need to start teaching their children that the entire world is not their playground."

    Parents can teach a 3-year old all day until the cows come home, the child will agree, and the child will obey ..... right up until the instant he/she forgets. A 3-year old's brain just isn't developed enough to understand the consequences when he wants the ball that has rolled under a car.

    The answers are always easiest for adults who have never raised children.

  • luv2organize Gainesville, VA
    Sept. 28, 2012 6:13 a.m.

    First of all not everyone could afford a car with cameras and they wouldn't be perfect anyway. Years ago I remember a Spot the Tot campaign. Basically it told people to walk around the entire car before backing up if you have small ones around or even pets that like to sleep under the shade of the car.

  • one day... South Jordan, UT
    Sept. 28, 2012 1:03 a.m.

    Parents MUST take care of their children!!! I live in Daybreak, about 4 blocks from the temple, the house next to me have like 5 little kids, you will find them playing and running around in the street all day!!!
    And I'm not talking about playing in streets only, also pleople who's looking for kids, you know?
    Fathers stop watching tv...Moms stop playing on facebook and take care of your kids...NOW!

  • Hutterite American Fork, UT
    Sept. 27, 2012 10:13 p.m.

    The government nothing. Parents need to start teaching their children that the entire world is not their playground. Do not play near the cars. The street out front is the exclusive domain of cars. You may not store your toys on, beside or near cars.

  • cjb Bountiful, UT
    Sept. 27, 2012 9:32 p.m.

    The government needs to mandate that all new vehicles come equipped with front and rear facing cameras to cover the blind spots so that children don't keep dying.