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Protections needed to stop an 'theocratic iron curtain' from falling say experts

Published: Thursday, Sept. 27 2012 6:00 p.m. MDT

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ute alumni
Tengoku, UT

flash
what's behind it is the hatred that some muslims have for anything different from themselves. keep in mind many are still living like they did two thousand years ago, not much progress and obama thinks he can walk them down from the cliff. good luck. all they understand is strength and this president exhibits anything but strength. barry has to go.

Stephen Kent Ehat
Lindon, UT

Oops. Mr. Brown's September 27 reference to "the protests in Muslim nations over the past two weeks that have claimed several lives, including that of the U.S. ambassador to Libya . . ." is both out-of-date and inaccurate.

A distinction exists between the protests, on the one hand, and the earlier terrorist attack, on the other. And in no way did any protests lead to or have indeed any part in the terrorist attack that occurred in Benghazi.

It was a terrorist attack. The United States government knew it within 24 hours of the attack that it was a terrorist attack. It took quite a long time for the government to publicly acknowledge that it was a terrorist attack. The spin has been all about the protests. Fine. There are protests. They can be linked to the video and to the anti-blasphemy laws and to differences between East and West on notions of "free speech" (which should be responsible freedom of the press). Sure we can only be worthy of "free speech" if we exercise it within appropriate spheres (political speech but not pornography). And blasphemy is below the dignity of "free speech."

But riots aren't terror.

chaliceman
Salt Lake City, UT

We have to remember that Christianity went through this same stage. Western nations and Christians executed and discriminated against those who blasphemed Christian symbols and that it wasn't until1952 that the Supreme Court ruled against them. We should not stand on the pulpit and call them out for something we and our forefathers were guilty of without a sense of compassion, knowing that they are walking in our foot steps. We also need to remember that it is the extremist minorities who are causing the problems, not the majority. They need us to shine the light of freedom and human dignity to encourage the majority to stand up against the vociferous minority. America's blessing to the world is and always has been to shine the light of freedom.

Tyler D
Meridian, ID

The simply solution would be for the modern world to leave these countries alone (in a Prime Directive like manner) while they evolve out of the Dark Ages. But given the reality of immigration – France will likely be a majority Muslim country in the next couple of decades with likely more European countries to follow – not to mention 9/11 as the most shocking example of the many terrorist attacks on the developed world, peaceful disengagement seems like a fantasy.

Further, since the leaders of many of these countries seem always quick to blame their internal dysfunctions (and channel their citizen’s rage) on the West, for better or worse, I do not see a realistic alternative to Netanyahu’s position outlined in his speech at the UN. A nuclear armed Muslim world (Pakistan notwithstanding), that believes burning a book or drawing a cartoon justifies a death sentence, is an existential threat to our entire way of life. It should not follow from modern notions of tolerance and co-existence, that we are suicidal.

Pete1215
Lafayette, IN

On the idea of international blasphemy laws. To the Amish, all of us English (non-Amish) are probably blasphemers. And to the Mormons, the rest of us are Gentiles. To Catholics, all of us who are descendents of followers of that Martin Luther guy have it wrong. Then there are Sunni Muslims and Shite Muslims, who even see each other as a stench in God's nostrels. I believe we are all blasphemers to someone. So an international blasphemy law would be just nuts.

Tekakaromatagi
Dammam, Saudi Arabia

Several years ago during an attack on the Danish consulate in Lebanon, the protestors who burned down the consulate waved a flag that said, "Mohammad, we will sacrifice our children for you." The hypocrisy of their anger over a cartoon depicting Mohammed is that Mohammed did not want people to worship him so he told them not to make any depictions of him. He wanted them to put God first. When people determine that upholding the reputation of Mohammed is so important that they will break Shariah Law and God's commandments, they have made Mohammed more important than God which is exactly why he did not want people to depict him.

IMAN
Marlborough, MA

It is possible that much of the "muslim rage" that has been in the news recently is being manufactured for political agendas and has nothing at all to do with religious views.

Mr. Bean
Ogden, UT

@chaliceman:

"We have to remember that Christianity went through this same stage."

Yes, and it took a few centuries to get Christianity on track. We don't have that long with Islam. They are at our doorstep as we speak. We are looking Shariah Law in the face. They already arrested the guy who did the video. Of course, on other charges but the effect is still the same. Official ensorship of speech.

"We should not stand on the pulpit and call them out for something we and our forefathers..."

Some one has to call them out to stop them. It may already be too late. Obama himself tells us there are 1,500 or more Muslim Mosques across America and, enough Muslims in America to be called a Muslim nation.

"We also need to remember that it is the extremist minorities who are causing the problems, not the majority."

A majority is not needed. An active minority can work the will of their leadership.

"America's blessing to the world is and always has been to shine the light of freedom."

The light of freedom can easily be snuffed out if enough people are ambivalent about the issue.

Alfred
Ogden, UT

@Tyler D:

"The simple solution would be for the modern world to leave these countries alone (in a Prime Directive like manner) while they evolve out of the Dark Ages."

That's not a solution. They are not content to be left alone. They are immigrating to western nations and bringing their religion, including Shariah Law with them. As you correctly point out, France will likely become a Muslim country in the near future... as will Germany, England, the Netherlands to name a few, where Muslims are migrating in large numbers. There are, as we speak, enclaves of Muslims in these countries who ignore the nation's laws and are being governed by Shariah. The local police don't enter these areas in many cases, and if the do, they are driven out. These are the facts. And it's coming to America unless we are vigilant. And our own US Constitution is no help since it allows freedom of religion... which includes any religion including those whose aim is to do us harm. God help us!

Tyler D
Meridian, ID

RE: Alfred
Ogden, UT

Did you read the rest of my post? We're in agreement. I think the Islamic threat is far greater than what we faced in the cold war. The Soviets were at least rational, preferring life to death. How do you fight an ideology that believes nuking Tel Aviv (or NYC) will get you paradise for eternity?

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