Comments about ‘Dozens of citations issued following state building contractor sting operation’

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Published: Friday, Sept. 21 2012 5:33 p.m. MDT

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DVD
Taylorsville, 00

Freedom does not mean that we have to live with 'caveat emptor'. Licensing and regulation are needed to keep crooks from reigning like kings in every field of labor

My2Cents
Taylorsville, UT

As usual this sting focused on the money the state was losing and not on whether these workers were skilled in doing the job they were performing. Sure, there are the scams but that is more likely to happen with a licensed contractor than an unemployed american trying to subsidize his abject poverty.

I have found licensed contractors are ripping off its customers with extravagant and inflated bids and their crimes are greater and more devastating than this sting operation portrays. Licensed contractors are more likely to hire and employ illegal foreign nationals and run a large tax evasion scam with substandard employees who don't have the skills to repair or build a home. A licensed contractor in Utah is a license to scam customers. Licensing contractors guarantees them a shield from law suits and court judgments.

America's skilled workforce is unemployed, over 50, and most likely unable to afford a license. I have tried the states method to seek licensed contractors but they have proven to be a nightmare with unskilled illegal workers. My rule of law, is no foreign nationals allowed to work for me has saved me thousands of dollars in home repairs.

JDL
Magna, UT

My2Cents:

Your rant that licensed contractors rip off their customers with extravagant and inflated bids is is not founded and is a gross generalization. As is often the case with your posts, you mix up several themes that individually may have some merit but used as broadly as you have used them today only confuses the facts and in the end makes no sense.

I assume you have never been a licensed contractor so let me educate you on what it takes to become licensed and then what it takes to remain licensed. 1) You must be qualified by proving 4 years competency in supervisory positions for the classification of license you are applying for or have on the payroll a qualifier for four full years. 2) You must pass the Business and Law exam and a trades exam. 3) You must provide evidence of min. 6 hours annually of continuing education in core business and trade. 4)You must provide continual General Liability and Workers Compensation insurance.

95 plus percent of contractors who meet these requirements are serious about providing quality work.

JDL
Magna, UT

My2cents Cont:

You make the claim that only over fifty, white Americans are skilled and can satisfy your construction needs.

To me, that sentiment is pure emotion and not based on any fact.

This is what I meant about how you confuse the issues, so I ask you, what does this have to do with licensed or unlicensed contractors anyway?

rnoble
Pendleton, OR

I know several very competent carpenters/builders that are skilled and able in terms of the trades but have never felt any desires of supervision that cannot "qualify" for that license. I also know several licensed contractors that do good paperwork but very poor work. If the licensing was really about protecting the public the emphasis would be on skills; not knowledge of law and business or supervision. The system is broken and shields contractors from competition just as much or more than it shields the public from scams or incompetence.

I recognize that I live in another state but I think most states contracting license boards work much the same as Utah's. I have qualified as a contractor myself but have since retired. In my state, because I am no longer licensed, I cannot even assist my neighbor unless I agree not to receive any remuneration including expenses. Frankly it is not because I am incompetent and my "neighbor" needs protection.

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