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Comments about ‘LDS Church outlines its approach to charitable giving’

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Published: Tuesday, Aug. 28 2012 10:46 a.m. MDT

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toosmartforyou
Farmington, UT

I find it somewhat interesting that those who claim they want to delve into the LDS practices of religion, charitable giving, missionary service, temple worship, daily lifestyle, etc are all too willing to do a partial analysis or look at those on the peripheral areas and ignore either the main stream or the entire story. This suggests to me, at least, that they have a forgone conclusion and they intend to seek just enough information to confirm their preconceived notions and biases. THat's not to say that we don't enjoy a few warts or have a few misguided individuals in either our history or in the fold currently, but certainly one wouldn't get a true picture of Jesus by interviewing only Judas.

And I think educating the curious is a good thing, which describes most of what is happening.

Cinci Man
FT MITCHELL, KY

The news outlets with recent incomplete stories have had full access to and even collected far more complete information for their stories than they reported. Tours of facilities and interviews where a more complete picture was articulated to the reporters. But when the actual article surfaced, there was deliberate omission of important information that was gathered. So, in the case of at least Bloomberg's joke of a journalist, misinformation. lack of information, and twisted information was given to support a less-than-favorable agenda by the organization. And the following day, Bloomberg representatives touted the story as an 'amazing' and 'informative' and educational' work of professional journalism at its finest. And many anti-Mormon enthusiasts agreed. Funny how that works. Deliberate spin on the truth. I hope that the Church, led by prophets, continues in its living by righteous principles.

A Scientist
Provo, UT

What is there to explain?

Take in billions of dollars each year; operate very profitable businesses; and give a pittance to charitable stuff.

Simple.

ute alumni
Tengoku, UT

da scientist
nice analysis. too bad you haven't a clue of what you are talking about. love to know what you do and how charitable you are. i suspect i know the answer........not much

Ernest T. Bass
Bountiful, UT

What I like is the charitable work done via the mall.

A Scientist
Provo, UT

ute alumni,

Not that your ad hominem deserves a reply, but I founded and continue to sit on the Boards of three charities that provide hundreds of thousands of dollars in assistance to people with special needs and challenges in life.

And NO religion is required!

Baccus0902
Leesburg, VA

I find the LDS church one of the best administered organizations in the planet.

I find the leaders of the church attempt to live the gospel and make the church a true Christian entity.

I cannot explain however, where is the disconnect between the preaching of the leaders and the di the feelings of many of the Saints. While they are willing to share their material blessing with those less fortunate. On the other hand many tend to close their minds to the freedom of others.

I see the Saints eager to fill the stomach of a poor person. While limiting the free agency of those who happen to live their lives in a way that conflict with their "perception of the word of God".

However, I believe that the holy spirit is changing minds and attitudes among the Saints and others so called followers of Christ and love and social justice will prevail.

ulvegaard
Medical Lake, Washington

Granted, religion is not a necessity for charitable giving, but can we not appreciate the fact that the LDS church and other religious groups do indeed contribute to the poor. Skeptics can always argue that religions should give more, but those making such demands usually are missing some of the key facts and figures.

Another positive aspect of the LDS Church's view on welfare is that such programs should be administered in a way to help people get back onto their own feet and not encourage them to be permanently needy. Up until recently, the United States Government also had in place a policy which required welfare recipients to donate some of their time and labor to society. Such stipulations help people feel that they are of worth and not merely a faceless entity that needs to be endlessly supported.

Let's express our appreciation to anyone and everyone who tries to help; even when we don't think it is enough.

the truth
Holladay, UT

RE: A Scientist

NO religion required?

What is religion?

A building?
a book?
a prayer?

No. you are living religion.

It is about loving and caring about your fellowmen, doing all you are able to do for others.

How can you say no religion is required when it‘s fully ingrained into your life?

However, anyone can sit on a board and give away someone else's money, it‘s about what you do with your own money, time, and talent.

You are wrong about the church, all the money is used for the Lord's purpose and kingdom which has many many expenses.

It‘s wisdom to be profitable and not operate in debt.

Helping the poor and those need and in distress is not all about just giving them money. The church provides a broad spectrum of services that are an expense to the church, the profitable side helps pay for that.

The money is used to help as many as possible, to build people up so they are able to help others.

The church is to help not be a sugar daddy.

Religion is the individual doing as much good as they are able.

Pendergast
SLC, UT

re: the truth 9:32 p.m.

"What is religion?... Religion is the individual doing as much good as they are able."

No. Religion is nothing more than a political party wrapped around some guy's beliefs.

snowman
Provo, UT

A Scientist: You obviously don't have a clue as to how much good the church does

Aggielove
Cache county, USA

Religion is living by rules and a code.
Dong the best to never sway.
And also being baptized in a true church.
But, I know lots that aren't baptized and they are doing very fine.
Great people everywhere!
But, I love being lds.

justamacguy
Manti, UT

Dear Mr. A Scientist. Would you please publish the charitable organizations you represent. Because with an attitude like yours I would like to know who NOT to donate to.

across the sea
Topeno, Finland

Joe, once again a great article!

Too bad that so many people comment on this and really did not read the article, but seeked a way to express their own grievances.

So where is the Lord's tithing money being used - in global GROWTH and opportunity to millions. It will benefit the people who accept the Lord's Gospel and invite the holy Ghost to be their constant companion - AND - as the prophets have told us "take themselves out of the slums (spiritual, material, social)" with the Lord's help.
It also benefits hundreds of thousands who never will know which organization helped them.

Sadly a great possibility of discussing how we could do MORE (as individuals) is hampered by competition on terminologies (such as what is religion).

1aggie
SALT LAKE CITY, UT

When charities take our money, I think the least they can do is explicitly (by publishing exact numbers) let us know what happened to the money. I think that should be a condition of obtaining Section 503(c) status.

Just think, if all charities did this (published their numbers) then they wouldn't need to "explain their approaches to charitable giving" because we would clearly be able to see it without explanation.

Moderate Thinking
Bogota, Colombia, AA

I work for a federal government agency whose purpose is to provide humanitarian and development assistance to the poorest countries of the world. Each year we manage billions of dollars, trying our best to make sure that we get the most bang for our buck, and that as many lives are changed for the better as possible. I believe in the work that I do and stand by it.

I have also taken a strong individual interest in the program developed by the Church around the world. I've toured many facilities, met with officials at the Church Office Building, and talked to humanitarian representatives abroad in several countries. Moreover, I've seen hundreds of other organizations doing similar work - for-profit, non-profit, faith-based, and secular. Based on this experience, I can say this much without question - If all well-inteded organizations, including my own, were half as organized and efficient as the Church program is, we would see a drastic reduction in the poverty and suffering in the world. The Church program isn't perfect, but it is truly an impressive site to behold, and deserves the credit it is due.

DonP
Sainte Genevieve, MO

Okay all you naysayers. We have just heard from someone with boots on the ground. That should just about wrap up this discussion.

Balan
South Jordan, Utah

Funny how the Church gets castigated the same way Mitt Romney does - for being successful! Then all the naysayers ooze out of the woodwork self-righteously promoting how they would spend the Church's money. Typical anti-Mormon Rhetoric.

It doesn't matter how much good the Church does. For many they will never be able to see past their own prejudices and hatred to admit that the Church does any good at all.

kenny
Sterling Heights, MI

To A Scientist

Sounds to me you are saying that your efforts are somehow better than the LDS church efforts since you were eager to mention the boards you sit on and the groups you have formed. I congratulate you. Do you ever consider or have you ever been willing to work WITH the LDS church in this effort as you seem to be fighting AGAINST it. How charitable is that. I contribute a fast offering because I know that no money will be taken off the top for adminastrative cost. Also I know of the people my dollars are helping in many cases. They are the very people I attend church with. There have been times that I would have wanted to recieve but I would rather be on the giving side. Giving is a good place to be, and that is where we should all find ourselves. If you are there then so be it and if you are not then I hope you can find your way.

JWB
Kaysville, UT

Thank goodness for organizations such as churches of all kinds and beliefs that show charity or the love of God to others by caring. People have a hard enough time in this world without having to die without knowing that someone cared for them. People's hearts are turned to these people and even though some would demean those that give from their hearts and souls, I am grateful for all that is done for all people.

We live in a hard world that would criticize religions and churches for the good they do without having the government give handouts. The Deseret Industries has provided so many jobs and good for others especially when combined with Humanitarian Services. That is such a well run program and helps people help themselves in many communities.

The Utah Legislature, on the other hand, wants to keep it so far from having the appearance for doing good to all citizens, such as the Church does, that it is almost anti-help to people. They are required to do somethings due to federal funds but they do not show appreciation to others that are not of their in-power party. They are a club.

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