Comments about ‘Utah school lunches getting healthier, but pricier’

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Published: Thursday, Aug. 23 2012 5:51 p.m. MDT

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A voice of Reason
Salt Lake City, UT

65 cents to $2 vs the cost for parents to make a sack lunch

Personally, I would have never established our current system. People have become dependent on receiving help in place of magnifying their own answer to personal responsibility. I don't think it is in the children's best interest to take the 'social' system away now, but only because I believe we as a people are losing our will to do what is right- that parents who've grown dependent on others feeding their children would not fill their responsibilities and ultimately taking away a food program means hurting children.

The more we sink down this rabbit hole the worse off we'll be. I don't dispute that at all. Unnecessarily raising costs and society's increasing desire to become dependent will only make things worse. 60% for Salt Lake is a troubling number, especially with the growing number of people who seem unnecessary help.

All that said, what I strongly believe we need to fix this is not more policies, changes, or a radical new idea- but an old and abandoned idea- hard work, charity, and responsibility. We need to be a better people.

DN Subscriber
Cottonwood Heights, UT

Ah, the joys and economics of taking "FREE MONEY!" from Washington.

And, experience in some school districts already shows that kids will not eat the "healthy" new meal menus, so we will be wasting a lot of money for wasted food.

Why is the government in the business of feeding kids in schools in the first place? Because we have (almost) always done it is not a reason, only an excuse. At first it was just a few of the truly desperately poor needing lunch. Now it extends to most of the students, and provides breakfast and dinner as well. Why are parents not required to feed their kids? Did they fail to understand that having children is expensive, or just decide that taxpayers like you and I should pick up the tab for their offspring's medical, education, feeding, and clothing needs?

If you cannot afford kids, don't have them. That said, we should also eliminate the school lunch (and breakfast and dinner) program. Leave it up to parents or charities to feed their kids.

In case no one noticed, we are bankrupt and cannot continue every nice to have program that has been dreamt up.

worf
Mcallen, TX

The consumers are out numbering the producers, and survival skills are being lost.

My2Cents
Taylorsville, UT

Its time that the eduction systems drop this food catering operation that is a triple threat program running into cost overruns and out of control. If there are hungry children in teh schools its time to investigate the parents and why the parents aren't feeding their children.

Its not the schools or taxpayers duty to be a food catering serivcei for they are calling children threatende with famine. It's a sign of incompetence that education is wasting millions of dollars for education to be illegal surrogate parents for food and health problems related to food.

All thser chlldren who have entiltement to other state food programs like WIC and food stamps and week end home delivery, the parents are being well funded to feed them at home and that is where the responsibleity lies.

Its rediculous that our state is allowing this carnage and drain on our schools, teachers, and education system to tripplicate feeding the children proprams alerady in place.

Not only should this fucnion be put in the hands of parents it would eleliviate any coslty food alergy screening which must cost a fortune to make 3 meals a day for one childs alergy.

TCnewsie
Tooele, UT

So kids are paying more money in certain districts for a smaller portion of food? That doesn't make a lot of sense to me. Teachers that elect to eat school lunch also had their prices increased also and that is wrong because the fact that they really don't make that much to begin with. This is just another example of Michelle Obama trying to prove that she is worth something but in the end she, just like her husband, is costing families more money.

Me, Myself and I
The Promised Land, UT

Bottom line is these meals are NOT healthier! They contain the same processed meat products full of nitrates and other preservatives, a lot less fresh vegies most are frozen and you don't have a choice in what you take. All this program did is create more waste. Wasted food (since it's an all or nothing deal with what you put on your tray a lot gets thrown away) wasted money and more kids will not eat their school lunches. I would like to see this program run out of the kitchen at the White House, if it were I have no doubts it wouldn't last long.

Mokie
Right Here, UT

WOW!! If only lunches were that cheap down here in Washington County. My student in Elem. is paying around $3 for their lunch and the High School students are paying $3.25. Lets bring some of that cheap food down here please.

worf
Mcallen, TX

This is sad, and I wish to be wrong:

* Americans can't feed themselves.
* Americans can't supply they're own housing, and needs, without federal help.

In our own country, more then twenty thousand American companies are now foreign owned, and we can't even supply any more then fifty percent of our doctors, engineers, and chemists. We don't engineer our car engines, transmissions, or smart phones. We are becoming subjected to outsiders.

What are we teaching our children by giving them and their families free food? Where is the urgency needed to pick our country up, or are we becoming a country of beggars? Where is the American spirit? Quit giving food, and teach the students to farm.

JoeBlow
Far East USA, SC

"This is sad, and I wish to be wrong:"

In many cases, your wish has been granted.

A voice of Reason
Salt Lake City, UT

Mokie,

Parents down there can buy groceries and prepare sack lunches just as easily as parents up here can.

jrgl
CEDAR CITY, UT

I'm happy to see the school lunch program get healthier foods. I'm seeing our district adding vegetables & fruits & whole grains for a few years now. It started with a few pilot schools. I used to work in the schools & found it frustrating in the old days when the school lunch was a slice of pizza, an enormous amount of french fries, ketchup (counted as a serving of vegetables, oh my), a roll and perhaps some canned peaches, giant cookie & chocolate or plain milk. As for those who are critical of students eating reduced or free school lunch, this is not a new program! It's horrible as a school staff person to watch students who go without lunch! I'm all for feeding our youth healthy foods even if it costs more. When you work in the schools it's obvious the difference

My2Cents
Taylorsville, UT

It seems even school teachers are not immune to being illiterate and lack no sense of food values. If what these schools are feeding these children is called good eats then the teachers are full fledged fast food junkies and should be forced to take some food nutrition classes. Filler food seems to be the majority to the diet and not deserving of its claims.

The children not eating from the school lunch programs must have more intelligent parents who can see through the veil of this phony food program, just as I have seen and witnessed in my local schools. It's food even a hog would throw up and we are wasting billions of dollars in Utah as surrogate parents who are not responsible for a childs health and nutrition.

It is illegal for government and teachers to to mandate what children eat and how they eat or their health. I would prefer that schools concentrate on improving brain education and not stomach contents or child health issues.

Schools are junk food junkies and the menu is just for show and tell with no proof of its value as a education course.

worf
Mcallen, TX

Hmm? Food stamps and school lunches.

How many Americans are being fed by government? Is this an educated society reaching the American dream?

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