Comments about ‘Fires and fireworks: The numbers are telling, but just what do they tell?’

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Published: Sunday, July 29 2012 5:12 p.m. MDT

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My2Cents
Taylorsville, UT

Just as everyone knew from the past and history of bear fires in this state. Not only were fireworks not a problem, neither were sport shooting in the wild.

People have more common sense than the governor gave them credit for and his spasmodic knee jerking didn't prove but one thing, he thinks the state landscaping department has constitutional authority to dictate gun control laws contrary to the Supreme Court rulings that no state or government can control when and where guns are fired. Not even in open range, BLM property, or unpopulated areas.

The Supreme Court ruling affects even hunting and wildlife laws of Utah. It's even legal to shoot from vehicles, across roads, near homes where wildlife roam, or in your home and on your property. In other words all shooting restrictions are illegal, as it should be. Not even a thief running off with your million dollars treasures.

It puts common sense and rights back in the hands of individuals who are citizens of the US.

Go Big Blue!!!
Bountiful, UT

I've been lighting fireworks for over 40 years without injury or any fire damage. This year I could not use fireworks simply because my address is east of Orchard Drive. My yard and my neighbors' yards are just as green as those West of Orchard. I guess the government needs to have control over everything I do at home.

Poeple should be responsible for their actions, but freedom requires that poeple be allowed to act responsibly.

Lady Falcons Fan
Syracuse, UT

Out of 603 fires this year, only one was caused by fireworks.

Protecting the wilderness areas and places with dry grass danger is high is understandable, but not developed neighborhoods where people are most likely to light off fireworks. Campaigns to promote 'common sense and personl responsibility' are brilliant, but campaigns that use fear and intimidation should be avoided at all costs.

More education, less regulation.

Brave Sir Robin
San Diego, CA

Ban fireworks anyway. Not because they're dangerous, but because they disturb the peace.

If a neighbor is having a party at 10:30, blasting music and yelling and screaming, most of you will call the cops right away. So why is it OK for you to be making even more noise with fireworks at the same time of night? Why should your right to embrace your inner redneck trump my right to get a good night's sleep?

Go Big Blue!!!
Bountiful, UT

Sir Robin, in Utah fireworks are only allowed over three holidays a year. When we celebrate New Years, Independence Day and Pioneer Day. Times that should be celebrated. Perhaps you should get out and enjoy life more.

Shawnm750
West Jordan, UT

While it's true that only one fire was caused by fireworks, I still think the ban on fireworks and target shooting was the right move to prevent even more fires. But, we also need to consider that the fires caused by fireworks and target shooting were some of the biggest of the fires that we've had. This was just simply a case of the cities and state taking preventive measures. True, it made for a tamer fireworks season, and some were upset that they couldn't light their own fireworks. But in the long run I think we'd all rather forgo some of that for one year and not have to pay the cost of fighting even more fires, not to mention the other issues such as mudslides that accompany them.

williary
Kearns, UT

It's pretty simple. If the great people of Utah were intelligent enough to not continue causing fires, seems like this year most due to target shooting, that's when the government is responsible to step in, as they did.

Common sense is a beautiful thing. Unfortunately, it's a trait that has missed too many people.

MapleDon
Springville, UT

@Williary

I can't put it any more simply or civilly than this: yes, "common sense is a beautiful thing." However, it shouldn't be a requirement--or a law.

You think you cherish freedom, but you allow and approve of government robbing everyone of it and liberty--because, as you put it, we all need to have common sense.

Further, you seem to have fallen for the media's effort to fool the public--and that was to convince you that most of the 600+ fires were caused by target shooters. The fact is a handful of fires (again, out of the 600+ total) were attributed to target shooters. I've researched each of the cases and so far none have been proven. (They were attributed due to the areas being frequented by target shooters.)

Sure, cherish common sense. But I recommend cherishing knowledge and wisdom (as well as freedom and liberty) even more.

ulvegaard
Medical Lake, Washington

For some time now, most regulatory organizations - including the government, have resorted to a reaction based scenario. Something happens, they jump up and create a low to address the issue. A fire starts and so, at the speed of light a new law is written banning anything related to a fire. Someone drowns and water is the culprit.

It is noted that we do need laws. But laws cannot possibly address every single issue, or prevent ever conceivable error. Somehow legislators need to structure laws which enable and encourage people to make wise decisions and spelling out consequences when they don't; rather than simply shackling people tighter and tighter so that they cannot move and thus not make a mistake. Until people are allowed to experience their own consequences, behavior will never change.

JoeBlow
Far East USA, SC

When people are held financially and criminally accountable for their actions, then freedom can prevail.

How many have the financial means to compensate for the loss of homes and the cost of fighting the fires when their actions cause these fires.

You know, that personal responsibility thing.

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