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Comments about ‘Toddlers and touch screens: pros and cons for parents to consider’

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Published: Thursday, July 5 2012 4:41 p.m. MDT

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Hutterite
American Fork, UT

When I see a tiny kid wandering through the mall entranced by some gadget in their mitts, it's tiny speaker squeaking out the siren song they all seem to hear, I'm torn. I know that kid's destined to grow up with the social skills of a fencepost. On the other hand, they're usually so entranced by that little machine that's sucked more out of people than anything scientology could come up with that they're not screaming at, or near, me. So that's good.

one old man
Ogden, UT

My young grand-daughters (4 and 6) are whizzes with their touch screens. But they don't seem to be addicted. Not yet, at least. Dad is a computer programmer. They seem to be learning by leaps and bounds from the little gizmos.

As an old school teacher, I really have very mixed feelings about these things. With some control and lots of supervision, they can be a terrific asset.

It all makes me wonder what my grandkids will see when they are grown up. I look back at changes in my 71 years and am absolutely amazed. But now it seems that changes are coming at breakneck speed -- much faster than in the past. It blows the mind of someone who was just becoming comfortable with the 20th Century when when the 21st came charging over us.

I'm awed by it all and just hope that humans will be wise enough to keep it all in perspective and use it for the good of all mankind.

Dr.S
Us, IL

As a child psychiatrist expert in this area, I urge parents to use tablets inside a relationship with the younger child and stay present.

tallen
Lehi, UT

I have found that I really have to limit my sons access to the ipad or I see the same things the article says; entranced by the screen, screaming if I take it away, etc. If I let him, he would play with it all the time. If I'm letting him use it as an educational tool I'll sit next to him and talk to him about what he's seeing on the screen (that's a frog, what does the frog say? That's a chicken, etc.). It is wonderful for road trips or when I have to get something done. Otherwise, it's hidden out of sight. Also, my son is much more likely to mimic my behavior. If I come home from work and just look at my phone, he just wants to look at a screen. But if I sit down and play with him, he doesn't care one bit about the ipad. Limited, supervised ipad time is okay with me, but unrestrained access is a definate no.

Johnny Triumph
American Fork, UT

This is little different than the Atari game systems or Gameboy machines of the past years, parents still have a responsibility to regulate and teach their children moderation. Try reading to your children and putting the book down at the end of a suspenseful chapter, you'll hear much the same whining as when it's time to put down the tablet. It would seem that researchers and media are forgetting the past when examining the technology of the present and future.

Veseloiu
London/UK, 00

This is all nice about the psycho-social But one of my concerns, asI am getting ready to buy 10" Android tablets for my 6 year-old daughters and for my slightly older son, is about having a child interact for 1-2 hours a day with a computer device that has a chip running at Giga-hertz /microwaves frequencies and also a little GHz (microwaves) frequency radio-station (the wireless connection) and touching touch-enabled screens where the child prectically becomes part of a high frequency electronic circuit (like a capacitor, when using capacitive screens).
I have seen no study on the possible physiological effects the aspects above may have on such young bodies and while it's possible that there would be no negative side effect, I believe that such studies MUST be carried out and published before we get to raise, with the best intentions, and with the "help" of these smart touch screen devices, a generation of very smart but severely disabled kids. I do not wish to be a scaremonger...from this angle as well
Any views or feedback on that, please?

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