Comments about ‘Do Mormons really want recognition as a 'mainstream' religion?’

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Published: Wednesday, May 23 2012 9:36 a.m. MDT

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annewandering
oakley, idaho

A Scientist:
According to D&C 1:14, those who do not believe in Mormonism will not be tolerated at all:

"...the day cometh that they who will not hear the voice of the Lord, neither the voice of his servants, neither give heed to the words of the prophets and apostles, shall be cut off from among the people;"

Hmm well that means they will be cut off of from His people. In truth they have already cut them selves off by that point. Why would this even matter to someone not LDS? Cut off does not mean shunned by the way. It just means no longer counted in membership.

RAB
Bountiful, UT

@ als Atheist

Wrong. Just because Latter Day Saints believe their church is the true one, does not mean that they expect others to recognize them as such. Most are surprised that other people do not think the same about their own religions. I know I couldn't live that way. But you can go right ahead and not believe whatever you want.

@ no fit in SG

Wrong. Scriptures and teachings towards blacks has not changed. All that has changed is the speculation as to why the Lord apparently delayed giving the priesthood to black men. Personally, i think it was a misunderstanding and that Joseph Smith only meant to say that priesthood authority should not be given to blacks who are still slaves subject to another person's will. Church members now worry and fear that the delay was just prejudice, but i was around in the 60s and 70s and I was always taught to love black people as much as anyone else, that they were equal to any white man, and that the lord would one day give them the priesthood. We saw the delay as God's will--not man's will.

RAB
Bountiful, UT

@ skeptic

Wrong. Mormons are as well-educated and open-minded as anyone. The majority of so-called “history” is not backed up with indisputable evidence. If you are predisposed to either defy or support the church, you can find ample “history” to support your assumptions. It is much better to judge Mormons by their current beliefs.

@Brahmabull and DonP

Wrong. All prophets are first and foremost human beings. They are no more required to be infallible than you are. The difference is that prophets were called of God because of their qualifications the best available spokesmen for God. We therefore can almost always trust their words over the words of the average non-prophet. Yet, they can still err, be misunderstood, or allow their feelings and opinions to mix with what the lord wants them to say. YOU therefore, will never be released from YOUR responsibility to be spiritually receptive to God’s verification of their words.

@ A scientist

Wrong. The quoted scripture is talking about judgment day for each individual—not some future day of universal intolerance. It is merely a plea for people to not reject God.

Moontan
Roanoke, VA

Actually, I'd begin to worry if 'mainline' denominations considered the LDS Church just another member of the club. America has become a moral wasteland on their watch; I don't want their recognition, and I was a Protestant for 44 years.

Let them have their prosperity theology, scandals, private jets and lavish lifestyle, and the growing obsession with sex-related sermons.

The one, true Church suits me just fine.

lars
Pittsburgh, PA

The Mormon faith isn't the only one that struggles with deciding what's doctrine and what's opinion. For instance, every Bible translation I've seen states very clearly that women should not speak in church. And yet, how many denominations actually hold that as doctrine?

sue1951
MAY, TX

seems that every time I read an article, there is bashing of some sort. I live in the mission field, I do want to be seen as different, but it is hard on the kids, so sometimes I would like to see us mainstreamed. My kids and grandkids wouldn't have to be afraid cause the teachers would say things about their faith. I am a convert. Those of you who live where there are a lot of LDS take our faith for granted. When there is only a hundred members within 50 miles you stay close.

RanchHand
Huntsville, UT

@Kith;

All of the 12 and the Councilors to the President of the Church (note: that is his real title) are ordained "prophets, seers and revelators". Each one of them, not just the "president". (It wasn't until David O. McKay's time that the word "prophet" came into use for the President of the LDS Church, prior to that it ALWAYS referred to Joseph Smith.

Kith
Huntington Beach, CA

Brother Chuck Schroeder

"ALL Mormons really want recognition as a mainstream religion."

Please speak for yourself.

OnlytheCross
Bakersfield, CA

It does not matter in the least who "mainstreams" what. People of faith retain their beliefs for many different reasons, as evidenced by statements here. My pioneer grandparents were the most dedicated, faithful, loving people you could find on this earth. I do not share their religious beliefs, but I am proud of my heritage. They taught us to study God's Word, ask Him for the answers, and then remain true to what He told us, because Judgment Day will be solely between us and our God.

They were heart-broken, as was my family, when I did read all of God's Word and discovered a different truth. But that didn't stop the love, the mutual prayers, or our DNA. We respect each other's convictions, and it will never matter what some social, ecclesiastical or media body declares about mainstream religion.

But the article was interesting. It reveals what academics still don't get about religious believers. No "Shock and Awe" has converted one Taliban, terrorist, or fanatic. The human will is not predictable.

Conversely, no Bible-only believers will ever accept a Bible-Plus theology. Not in two more millenia either..

atl134
Salt Lake City, UT

@RAB
"Personally, i think it was a misunderstanding and that Joseph Smith only meant to say that priesthood authority should not be given to blacks who are still slaves subject to another person's will."

God woudn't let such critical mistakes hang around 120 years in a church if it had a direct line to God.

awsomeron
Waianae, HI

Yes. I see it as a mostly good thing. However what some Mormons want most is to be Reconized as the Worlds Only Religion or Only True Religion. All others falling somewhat short.

That Not Happening any time soon. So we take what we can get. In any good Religious Demographic Pie. (As a direct Marketer I made my living with Dempgraphics), Mormons have their own small Slice. They are other wise listed as Christian or Other. However in the Good Pies the ones with lots of suger and sales, Mormons have their own small slice. (around 10 percent more or less) World wide its a % of less then 1, but you are talking a 7 Billion People and including the Non Religious. Good Demo Pies do Not Lump Mormons.

Now Mormons don't even lump Mormons. Active, Less Active, Inactive, Widow, Single Young Adult, Single Adult, so forht and so on.

Mormons are a World Wide Church and are part of the Mainstream. Some places it trickles but some place Religion Trickles also, but its there.

The Deuce
Livermore, CA

To: als Atheist Provo, UT - you made the statement "We have seen such Dominionist belief systems throughout history. It never turns out well for those who don't believe the same way." This implies that Jesus Christ has returned to the earth. Do you really think that things will be the same given this change in direction? You needed to qualify your comments by indicating that the LDS believe that Christ will be the head of all things. Even as a non-member I understand this from their teachings and you live in Utah. If we make the assumption that Christ is now the leader of all, it would be reasonable to assume that the "domination" that you suggest would not exist based upon what we read of Christ's teachings in the Bible. Now if you do not believe in Christ, then what the LDS believe has no value to future events.

Dennis
Harwich, MA

I love the statement that "Mormons are a peculiar people".
Every bit as peculiar as Scientologists, Jehovah Witness, etc. etc. etc.
All a little different, all think they're "right", all expect your money, time and devotion.
The entire block of Mormons do worry a little too much about what others think.
"We spend our whole lives worrying about what others think about us, we get older and find out nobody was paying any attention".

junkgeek
Agua Dulce, TX

Juan Figueroa - Very little of what you described is really a problem outside Utah. There are lots of places where chapels are a short drive away, homework-free youth nights, etc. And outside Utah, you get early morning seminary, which frees up a period for advanced students to take another class. And you get two political parties!

Marcellus
West Jordan, UT

This article fails to consider the difference between doctrinally mainstream and societally mainstraim. I think Mormons can be recognized as mainstream in the sense that they are not viewed as a cult or fringe religion and yet not be considered mainstream in the sense of abandoning or diminishing the doctrines which distinguish Mormons from other religions. We can still be a peculiar people even as we become a more populous people, popular people, or at least more publicly recognized people.

esodije
ALBUQUERQUE, NM

It's hard not to draw comparisons between the LDS Church and the RLDS Church, which has become so "mainstream" (even changing its name to the "Community of Christ") that from my perspective it almost has no reason to exist, at least separately from a number of protestant churches. Our relevancy lies largely in what distinguishes us from other religious faiths, or from the world in general, so it's almost a truism that the more mainstream we become, the less we have to offer.

Thinkman
Provo, UT

The leadership of the LDS church seemingly does want the "mainstream religion" moniker.

Why?

1. Blacks get the priesthood over 100 years after slavery is ended
2. Softening and changes in the temple ordinances
3. Church no longer embraces the Hinckley-named couplet: As God is man may become and as man is, God once was.
4. Promotion of the Bible on TV by the LDS Church
5. I am a Mormon campaign

These are hard evidence items of the LDS church leadership wanting the church to be more mainstream. Other very clear indications are evident as well.

Brahmabull
sandy, ut

Is it then possible that god didn't tell them to do it at all? I mean it seems rediculous that god would say to do something, then later say wait now don't do it. Do this, now stop, now do that, now stop. I don't think god cares about all of these little things. I think he cares about how we treat others, that is what every commandment comes back to. Not how much money I pay in tithes, not how many times I step into a building on sundays, not how many times I read the words(opinions) of prophets in the scriptures from thousands of years ago, in a land not near here, in a culture not close to mine. I don't think he cares if I smoke or gamble or have facial hair. Point is, maybe it is the people are just THINKING god told them to do something. Didn't Warren Jeffs claim that god told him to do what he did? Anybody can say that.

LValfre
CHICAGO, IL

@Brahmabull,

I agree. If you have personal revelations and a relationship with God .... why subjugate your conscious to a prophet?

Demiurge
San Diego, CA

The "god" of the LDS is not "god" as understood by other Semitic religions. The LDS god is neither omnipotent nor omnipresent, though it may be omniscient. The existence of multiple deities (whether one is to do with them or not) precludes the first two, along with the idea that god is inside the universe in a physical body.

The universe to the LDS was not created ex nihilio by their god, nor were "souls" created by their god, but like that matter which formed the universe always existed.

These differences are fundamental, not peripheral, differences in the nature of the respective deities.Because of this, the LDS will never be mainstream.

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