Comments about ‘In the Whirled: The gospel and the power of limited life choices’

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Published: Wednesday, April 25 2012 5:00 a.m. MDT

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Gracie
Boise, ID

Good work once again, Tiffany!

fowersjl
Farmington, Utah

Great article, Tiffany. My choice was to marry early and start a family early, but did not get that option. So, after college, teaching, graduate school, and an LDS mission (at the age of 25) finally got to the marriage part of life. And it certainly has been the best part of my life, with nine children, scores of grandchildren, and a great husband.

infoman
Cedar Hills, UT

Good article with some great points. The only flaw is the mention of caffeine, which continues the perpetration of the idea that it in itself is against the Word of Wisdom, when it actually is not.

GD
Syracuse, UT

Nice article. Personally I find my choices which others view as limiting to be just the opposite. I watch people having "fun" and say to myself I'm can have "fun" without the addictions etc that so many become slaves to.

gatsby
Murray, utah

Thanks Tiffany, for another thought provoking, articulate article. I just got back from the grocery store, and yes, the amount of "choices" we have as a society is mind boggling--and time consuming. And I couldn't agree with you more about the lack of direction that many young adults face these days.

As a parent, I also find that many parents are sucked into the whole idea of "choice" in terms of what school to attend, what activites their children should pursue etc. Everything is packaged as a "choice" or an "opportunity," when what most kids really need, are fewer choices and more boundaries.

And when it comes to marriage, I love the phrase "Choose your love, love your choice." I saw it in my sister's kitchen years ago, and believe that recently, President Monson used it in an address. Some decisions need only be made once--like one's choice of a spouse. I know there are extenuating circumstances, but our marriages would be so much stronger if we practices this principle.

Kith
Huntington Beach, CA

Great article. I'm a young adult and I'm definitely stuck trying to figure out what to do. Infoman, caffeine is implied in the Word of Wisdom. It's not an out of bounds under all circumstances like alcohol, but it is addictive, and as most if not all addictive substances staying away from it is preferable.

sharrona
layton, UT

RE: Take the Word of Wisdom, for example. Because I made the simple choice long ago not to drink alcohol or caffeine, I never have to decide what type of wine to drink with dinner.

Wine was used by Noah, Gen 9:20,21 . Melchizedek, Gen 14:18. Isaac Gen 27:25. Jesus 2:1-11, He turns water into wine not wine into water And Mt 11:19.. Timothy 1Tim 5:23. Mogen David is popular wine for the Jewish Passover in modern times.

Whos Life RU Living?
Ogden, UT

Arranged marriages would help limiting choices!

garybeac
Chapel Hill, NC

You lost me at "caffeine." Colas are not forbidden by the present interpretation of the WOW.... Not having a delicious glass of white wine with a special meal or a cold beer after a hot day's work does not define you, it just limits your experience of this wonderful world. I think Joseph said, "not by commandment," exactly to prevent people from using the WOW as a limiter, a "constraint." Wanting to limit ourselves seems contrary to the purpose of life. I can think of only one good reason for a healthy non-pregnant adult to abstain from moderate alcohol: to avoid tempting the sick-at-heart who might become alcoholics. However, we can also avoid tempting them by simply using wine and beer privately. Besides all this, the original WOW seems to endorse beer: "barley...for mild drinks." Sorry hair-splitters, beer was the only "mild drink" made with barley in 1833. Unfortified wine (i.e., "pure wine") also seems endorsed. Finally, there is alcohol in ice cream, fruit, and whole wheat. Where do we draw the imaginary line? Let's stop looking for ways to make it harder for...everyone to accept the restored gospel.

Swedish reader
Stockholm, Sweden

Garybeac - the reason the Word of Wisdom was given "not by commandment" at first was that it takes time to quit using addictive substances, and the Lord let the saints do that work without the additional pressure of being commandment breakers while getting out of the habit. It was later made a commandment (through Brigham Young, I believe) and the "hot drinks" were defined as tea (from the tea bush, not herbal) and coffee. From then on it IS a commandment, and abstaining from alcohol is not just about not tempting the weak. As to caffeine, in 1972 a Priesthood bulletin said regarding cola drinks "we counsel against the use of any drink containing harmful habit-forming drugs under circumstances that would result in acquiring the habit". The ban on alcohol is absolute, as is the ban on coffee, whereas caffeine in soft drinks is a more matter of moderation and temperance.Finally, the point is for people to accept the Restored Gospel - if it has to be watered down to be acceptable, it isn't the Restored Gospel that's being accepted.

Strider303
Salt Lake City, UT

Nice article, good food for thought.

What's up w/ WOW issue? For me I suggest the following: Caffeine is a stimulant and can be addictive, this I know from personal experience as a psych nurse and, check out the Mormons with their death grip on big gulps of Coke, Pepsi or Dr. Pepper (aka Mormon Beer). While D&C 89: states WOW is only the "will" of God, I refer you to Matt 6:10 where Jesus teaches us to pray God's Kingdom to come and His "will" be done. Split hairs if you want, as for me I avoid both caffeine and alcohol. I grew up in a alcoholic ravaged home I have seen and experienced the damage alcohol can cause. I somehow do not think playing the Philadelphia lawyer with the Savior, the Righteous Judge of us all, is a good idea. Suck it up, drive closer to the canyon wall than the edge of the winding mountain road (old Mark Twain analogy).

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