Comments about ‘Author says cohabiting first may increase likelihood of divorce’

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Published: Monday, April 16 2012 1:31 p.m. MDT

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Dennis
Harwich, MA

Author has so idea what he's talking about. Everybody should live together for a year or two (at least) before committing to marriage. It's religion that gets in the way of common sense on this issue.

kishkumen
American Fork, UT

Notice how there was no study referenced in this story. I found a U.S.A. Today study involving 13,000 people that concluded: "The data show that those who live together after making plans to marry or getting engaged have about the same chances of divorcing as couples who never cohabited before marriage." So, that contradicts the author in this story.

OHBU
Columbus, OH

I love how the author dismisses the notion that cohabitating couples are likely to be less conventional than those who don't. Of course they are...cohabitation is not a conventional practice in this country. They are, by definition, less conventional. There is no way to separate that factor.

There is also no way to know how many couples, had they chosen not to cohabitate, might have gotten married, leading to divorce. The preventative effects of cohabitation on divorce rates is impossible to gauge.

CaptainMidnight
Saint George, UT

Dear Dennis, kiskumen, and OHBU

"The Defining Decade: Why Your Twenties Matter — and How to Make the Most of Them Now." the extensive study compiled by Meg Jay and reviewed by many peers in her field of expertise is the study used for the conclusions of this article. the study is clearly identified in the article. Perhaps perusal of more than the title of the article as well as the material itself before jumping to conclusions about religion and methodology would be a good first step. Also neither author (study or this article) is a HE.

Buzzards
LEHI, UT

If you think about it, it makes perfect sense, but not for the reasons the author postulated. Couples who are more likely to see marriage as a lifelong committment from the get go would be less likely to deal with difficulties in a marriage by getting divorced, while those more likely to end the marriage if the going gets rough would be the same group who would be predisposed to give it a trial run.

Cats
Somewhere in Time, UT

There have been NUMEROUS studies for many years that indicate living together before marriage causes a higher likelihood of divorce. On top of that, it's morally wrong and damaging to children.

Women, if someone doesn't love you enough or have the character to marry you, get rid of him and find someone who does.

LValfre
CHICAGO, IL

@Cats,

"There have been NUMEROUS studies for many years that indicate living together before marriage causes a higher likelihood of divorce. On top of that, it's morally wrong and damaging to children."

Here we go again with Cats high morals outshining everyone else. Pure arrogance as usual.

Most couples I know cohabited before marriage. It's a very logical progression for a relationship and more common than you think.

Nan BW
ELder, CO

I'm with Captain Midnight, Cats and the author of the article who did use a study for back-up, as have many others who have researched and written about this topic. Marriage is rough, tough and sometimes ever so exasperating, but if my spouse and I had cohabited before we were married, it would not have worked. And that means we either would not have had our delightful productive children, or we would have raised them as divorced parents. Sorry I'm being anecdotal again, but the author was not.

Hutterite
American Fork, UT

Is this the latest DN bogeyman?

OHBU
Columbus, OH

Re: CaptainMidnight

Please indicate where I said there was no study cited...perhaps it would behoove you to read my entire comment rather than peruse it and lump it with others.

My point is that all these studies are a bit flawed because there is no way to fully isolate the impact of a person's general opinion of marriage and divorce outside cohabitation. In other words, is cohabitation the cause, or the symptom?

Drew1house
PLEASANT GROVE, UT

Correlation does not indicate causation... I think that even if this was true many of those who co-habit and then marry are agreeing to do so when the relationship is already on the way out... I agree with the question is cohabitation the cause, or the symptom?

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