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Comments about ‘Religious talk by politicians: a touchstone issue dividing America’

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Published: Wednesday, March 21 2012 6:18 p.m. MDT

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Riverton Cougar
Riverton, UT

"His conclusion: the fact that many Catholics won't let their religious conviction prevent them from voting for a Mormon like Romney illustrates why it's such poor form for large numbers of evangelicals to exclude a candidate from consideration solely on the basis of religion."

Great sentence! Are you listening, evangelicals?

DeltaFoxtrot
West Valley, UT

Want to know what happens when the Church runs the government? Take a look at Iran.

CHS 85
Sandy, UT

In Utah it is much more subtle. How many candidates who are soliciting votes on the radio make a point to insure we know that they went to BYU?

Riverton Cougar
Riverton, UT

"Want to know what happens when the Church runs the government? Take a look at Iran."

Thanks for the example, but none of the candidates are considering in any way having any church run the government. However, if you want to know what happens when a righteous, religious man runs the government, separately from the church, but in accordance with church principles, then read the Book of Mormon, particularly the books of Mosiah and Alma.

Lasvegaspam
Henderson, NV

Note to writer Tim Egan at the NY Times: The fact that "Rick Santorum doesn’t just wear his religion on his sleeve, he billboards it in neon," is quite refreshing, actually. Perhaps Rick’s neon broadcasting of religion will help people like, say, Bill Clinton understand that his fellow Americans denounce his extramarital sexual affairs and flagrant behavior. Nothin’ wrong with that sort of message being sent. Nothin’ at all.

Capella
Bakersfield, CA

Yeah, LVPam! Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Some find 'flagrant' secularism ugly, especially when masked behind a godless humanist.

For Biblical folks, we wished our current Commander-in-Chief had been more forthcoming on the religious issue. If your measuring stick is slick politics, fine. Stop forcing your principles and personal determiners on others, as if your civics lesson supercedes our Biblical guidelines.

And the more Romney et al share their value system and personal ethics, the better for those who want to discern a man's core principals. I wish I'd heard more of BHO's comments about folks "religion and guns" before I cast my primary vote. Boy did my important vote change after I researched his true tenets and the (lack of) his religious grounding.

Talk on, candidates. Spill your guts. No reset buttons, flipflops, or post-electorate revelations.

Ajax
Mapleton, UT

Senator Bennett and others are to be congratulated for the time and effort they have spent in explaining the disfunction of "ideological purity", which in the end is highly divisive in its marginalization and disdain of others. However, there will always be some who for whatever reason just do not get it. Fortunately they are a minority who while deserving of a place at the table do not own it. For the tail to have wagged the dog for so long in Utah life and politics is unfortunate.

carver
Enterprise, UT

The religion card will be played if Obama and Romney go head to head this fall. But it won't be played by Romney. It will be played by the liberal media under the direction of Obama.

raybies
Layton, UT

Most religious folks, especially in the USA, want to be free to exercise their religion without being mocked or derided for what they believe. We're all so sensitive as a people, and the press helps accentuate out differences, when most of us--I believe--are willing to let others believe whatever they want to believe as long as there's mutual respect towards those who believe differently. This concept of not just religious tolerance, but being open to sharing religions is what makes America unique in the world. I find it sad when the government's only solution to remaining secular is banning all religious expression--that's throwing the baby out with the bathwater.

I think Romney demonstrates a solid coalition of religious diversity, while being extremely supportive of religious freedom. He has proven he can hold the trust of those who hold very staunch socially conservative states, like Idaho. And he continues to welcome people into his umbrella of support regardless of their ability to thump bible verses.

Thinkman
Provo, UT

Best to keep religious talk out of any political talk. All religions claim their divinity and that they speak for God. Politicians can talk about moral values and doing good to others and striving for excellence, but they would be better served to keep their own religious views out of the debate.

DeltaFoxtTrot,

Want to know what happens when a Church runs the government?

Look at Utah. No doubt it is on balance a well-run state, but much subtle control over non-LDS by the LDS church is clearly evident.

CHS 85,

I've seen folks running for mayor and city council tout their LDS church leadership positions (Stake Pres, Bishop, other church leadership positions) in their campaign signs and literature.

Kalindra
Salt Lake City, Utah

@ Riverton Cougar: So the only example you can find is 2000 +/- years old?

Makes it a pretty rare event.

Which part do you think is in short supply - the "righteous" man in politics or the ability of said man to keep his religion out of government and allow others to worship according to the dictates of their own consciences?

Ranch
Here, UT

@RivertonCougar;

It's easy for fictional characters to be perfect in the way they run a government. Do you have any real examples for us?

@raybies;

You're all for "religious freedom" but God help anybody who doesn't want to live by your "religious convictions" and follow their own path freely. Nope, you just can't tolerate that particular religious freedom. There's a word for it: Hypocrisy.

Personally, I'm exhausted by all the religious talk in politics. Exhausted. The real problem is that those touting their religious beliefs, like Santorum, aren't willing to allow others to live their own belief system if it differs from the "Christian" one. Honestly, Romney isn't much better either.

atl134
Salt Lake City, UT

@Riverton Cougar
["His conclusion: the fact that many Catholics won't let their religious conviction prevent them from voting for a Mormon like Romney illustrates why it's such poor form for large numbers of evangelicals to exclude a candidate from consideration solely on the basis of religion."

Great sentence! Are you listening, evangelicals?]

Utah voted 89% for a losing candidate Romney last go around. It's wrong for evangelicals to use religion to vote, but clearly Mormons (Romney got 85% of the LDS vote in Nevada) are doing it too and it's wrong in both cases.

LValfre
CHICAGO, IL

Raybies - "We're all so sensitive as a people, and the press helps accentuate out differences, when most of us--I believe--are willing to let others believe whatever they want to believe as long as there's mutual respect towards those who believe differently. This concept of not just religious tolerance, but being open to sharing religions is what makes America unique in the world."

Where's the mutual respect for other's who believe differently in this founding prophet's statement?

Joseph Smith - "I was answered that I must join none of them, for they were all wrong, and the personage who addressed me said that all their creeds were an abomination in His sight: that those professors were all corrupt . . ." (Joseph Smith, "History of the Church, Vol. 1, page 5-6.)

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