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Comments about ‘Some fear auto industry returning to bad habits’

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Published: Tuesday, Sept. 2 2014 11:20 a.m. MDT

Updated: Tuesday, Sept. 2 2014 11:19 a.m. MDT

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Hutterite
American Fork, UT

Car dealers, both new and used, have become a great deal more about the financing than the car. You deserve a new car, the ads read. The truth is no, you don't. Not if you can't really afford it.

RSL*
Why, AZ

With more people buying new cars that in turn makes the good used cars cheaper for me. So while people take out loans I can save up and pay cash and not have to pay to have full insurance coverage for my car.

Thid Barker
Victor, ID

The worst bad habit American car companies practiced was giving in to union demands to raise their wages so high that American made cars became excessively expensive and poor quality. So much so that the Japanese and S. Koreans figured out how to make cars better and cheaper, which wasn't difficult! That's why nearly every other car we see on the road today is made by a foreign company. In other words, GM and Chrysler did it to themselves but who benefited the most? American consumers!

Objectified
Richfield, UT

This is a direct result of Obama's bailout program. It's become a low risk environment for American car manufacturers. If they get into financial trouble, Obama will bail them out again at taxpayer expense. Then voters are dumb enough to give him credit for doing so when he campaigns. Very dumb indeed.

This is yet another case of Mitt Romney being right. He warned that this would happen if those companies weren't forced to undergo protected bankruptcy and forced to reorganize from the ground up to become more competitive and efficient. With government bailouts to the tune of tens of billions of dollars, the incentive to improve became minimal.

Another prime example of Obama's lack of business experience in the real world, and of naive voters who continue to support him and his ill-advised policies.

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