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Published: Wednesday, May 21 2014 7:07 p.m. MDT

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Understands Math
Lacey, WA

Good news, and a very pragmatic decision from Pennsylvania's governor.

It's been a pretty amazing year, hasn't it? And not even half over.

USU-Logan
Logan, UT

It might take Gov. Corbett a while, but he has finally come to senses and stopped fighting the inevitable.

Governor Herbert, are you listening?

get her done
Bountiful, UT

Great, and fair.

Baccus0902
Leesburg, VA

""As a Roman Catholic, the traditional teaching of my faith has not wavered," Corbett said. "I continue to maintain the belief that marriage is between one man and one woman. My duties as governor require that I follow the laws as interpreted by the courts and make a judgment as to the likelihood of a successful appeal." Gov. Corbett

This is a good lesson.

Gov. Corbett as a Catholic disagrees with the ruling, yet he follows "the laws as interpreted by the court".

He is still the Governor of Pennsylvania. His state has more equality than before. No bad feelings by attempting to obstruct the wheels of justice. I think Gov. Corbett is showing dignity and class. Good for you Gov. Corbett and good for the people of Pennsylvania.

Northern Utahn
Northern, UT

@ USU-Logan
Logan, UT

"It might take Gov. Corbett a while, but he has finally come to senses and stopped fighting the inevitable."

I noticed that when a SECOND judge ruled against Utah, (Kimball), on Monday, that Reyes is less fervent about his "full speed ahead" rhetoric. Hurting gay people is becoming politically unpopular, even in Utah. Get ready for it.

The Wraith
Kaysville, UT

@Northern Utahn

Not to mention that it's a waste of money at a time when the state could put that money to better use elsewhere. I support gay rights so that aspect is far more important to me but the money being thrown away shouldn't be forgotten. The end result of all of this is crystal clear by now. Let's take those millions and do something good with it.

LovelyDeseret
Gilbert, AZ

This is how democracy dies.
The Supreme Court votes 9-0 to save marriage in Utah, essentially saying that there is a greater likelihood that Utah will prevail and yet the Governor of Pennsylvania apparently knows more than the unanimous Supreme Court about what is Constitutional?
This is an extremely dangerous precedent to democracy.

Understands Math
Lacey, WA

@LovelyDeseret wrote: "This is an extremely dangerous precedent to democracy."

You know what's a dangerous precedent to democracy? Putting the rights of an unpopular group of people up to a popular vote.

Utefan60
Salt Lake City, UT

LovelyDeseret, you say this is how democracy dies.....I counter that with this is exactly how a Democratic Republic survives. It isn't that the majority rules, it is the rule of law that takes precedent. This is how we protect any and all minorities against unlawful domination by a majority. This Governor realized that the law he was sworn to uphold had priority over his religious beliefs. That is how a democracy survives!

Henry Drummond
San Jose, CA

For the first time, a federal judge employed a higher standard of review in a Gay Marriage case. That makes it pretty difficult to defend. That's why Nevada officials are not going to defend their law either.

From the ruling:

“Indeed, it is unsurprising that Defendants muster no argument engaging the strictures of heightened scrutiny, as we, too, are unable to fathom an ingenuous defense saving the Marriage Laws from being invalidated under this more searching standard.”

Copy Cat
Murray, UT

Hurting religious people is becoming politically popular, even in Utah. Get ready for it.

Karen R.
Houston, TX

It was heartening to learn of this decision, and particularly the governor's comment that his decision was in spite of his personal religious beliefs. Kudos, Governor Corbett.

It has been alarming to watch our governmental leaders demonstrate a greater allegiance to their religions than to their country, state, or community. Some do so voluntarily; some feel compelled to lest they raise suspicions of their "loyalty." The religious right have their own PC demands. I'm grateful that this governor took seriously his oath to serve ALL in the state.

Congratulations to the people of PA. Your governor just officially ended state-sanctioned oppression of about 650,000 of your friends and neighbors, and saved you a tidy sum doing so. Not a bad day's work!

Bob K
Davis, CA

Copy Cat
Murray, UT
Hurting religious people is becoming politically popular, even in Utah. Get ready for it.

--- "Persecution Complex" intended to cover up their own sinful feelings of wanting to hate, to discriminate, and to place themselves above other children of God, has always been around it Utah.

Now might be the time for folks to see if they are doing as Jesus would ask, or if they are too busy defending their own beliefs.

Tiago
Seattle, WA

@Copy Cat
"Hurting religious people is becoming politically popular, even in Utah. Get ready for it."
I'm Mormon and gay. I'm very "out" about being Mormon. Everybody I know in all my circles knows about my faith. Some people ask silly questions or tease a bit, but in general my faith is highly respected and gives me benefits in my job, community, and family. I do not feel persecuted or hurt because of my faith.
On the other hand, I can only talk about my sexual orientation with a few close friends, family, and religious leaders. If I was more open, I would immediately lose some friends and be judged harshly by some members of my family and community. I hear nasty things daily about gay people that make me sick. Tonight I was talking in the church foyer after mutual and listened to a rant from a ward member about how gays are trying to destroy the BSA and victimize boys. That hurts! The way some religious people treat and talk about gay people is awful. It is becoming less accepted and that is a good thing.

Furry1993
Ogden, UT

@LovelyDeseret 5:25 p.m. May 21, 2014

Your comment is totally incorrect.

There is no need to "save marriage" in Utah. Marriage is not under attack, does not need defending, and will not change for the majority of people. The only thing different is that a small minority will no longer be second class citizens -- they will finally have the same right to civil marriage that the majority has. That is a good thing, and will strengthen the country and strengthen democracy.

The Supreme Court's stay does not indicate that it thinks Utah will prevail in its appeal. It merely maintains the status quo until the appeal is decided. That's a common practice for the Supreme Court, and nothing can be read from its stay. From the Court's decision in Windsor (states can decide marriage law unless their law violate the Constitution), it appears very likely that it would sustain Judge Shelby's decision (and the decisions of the judges in a multitude of jurisdictions who decided the same).

Gov. Corbett made a smart, practical and Constitutional decision. Good for him. It's too bad that Gov. Herbert didn't do the same.

RanchHand
Huntsville, UT

"The case is extremely unlikely to succeed on appeal," Corbett said in a statement."

True.

""As a Roman Catholic, the traditional teaching of my faith has not wavered," Corbett said. "I continue to maintain the belief that marriage is between one man and one woman. "

Then that is how you should live your life; whatever made you think you had the right to impose your religious views on others in the first place anyway?

@LovelyDeseret;

This is how our Constitutional Republic works.

@Copy Cat;

Please expound on how religious people are hurt by the marriages of LGBT couples?

Furry1993
Ogden, UT

@Copy Cat 7:26 p.m. May 21, 2014

Hurting religious people is becoming politically popular, even in Utah. Get ready for it.

-----------------

Nobody is trying tyo "hurt religious people". People should do as the Savior directs -- render unto Caesar the things that are Caesar's and render unto God the things that are God. Requiring people to eschew discriminatory practices at law is not "hurting: them. "Religious" people can still believe as they want. They can live according to the dictates of their religion and teach those dictates to their children all they want. They can still discriminate all they want in their private dealings. They just can't violate the Constitution while doing so. That is not hurful in any way.

Eliyahu
Pleasant Grove, UT

@Copy Cat

"Hurting religious people is becoming politically popular, even in Utah."

And how are religious people being hurt? It is neither the role of the courts or the duty of State law to enforce the religious beliefs of any particular group. My religion proscribes, among other things, eating pork. Am I being hurt because the law doesn't forbid that to others? The fact that it's legal to eat pork doesn't hurt my beliefs or my religion. Actually, it helps me because I must make a conscious decision to pass up pork every time I eat instead of not doing so because it's illegal. I make that decision because it's what I believe God wants of me rather than for fear of the government. Similarly, no one will require you to marry someone of the same sex even when it's legal, and it will be your own decision based on your own sexual orientation and your own religious beliefs to refrain from doing so. Legal compulsion to act a certain way creates the appearance of being religious without needed to actually believe anything. That, my friend, is what hurts religion and religious people.

Baccus0902
Leesburg, VA

@ Copy Cat
You wrote:

" Hurting religious people is becoming politically popular, even in Utah. Get ready for it."

That is a very paradoxical statement, since no one is trying to hurt anybody. Actually is like the torturer feeling harrased because his victim ask him to stop.

Your comment is also disingenuous since if we look at history, religious groups tend to be victims of other religious movements.

Besides, you shouldn't feel at a disadvantage, if this were a comptetition between secular groups and religious groups hurting each other. Religious groups would win by a landslide.

Schnee
Salt Lake City, UT

@LovelyDeseret
"The Supreme Court votes 9-0 to save marriage in Utah, essentially saying that there is a greater likelihood that Utah will prevail "

Someone's gonna be in for a major letdown... and it's not going to be the people who are 17-0 (or something like that) since Windsor.

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