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Comments about ‘The six most important lessons my marriage has taught me’

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Published: Tuesday, Feb. 18 2014 4:00 p.m. MST

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Mikhail
ALPINE, UT

Thank you for sharing your insights. I recognize the truth of what you have written. I, too, believe that these are central to finding a satisfying and rewarding marriage.

Mainly Me
Werribee, 00

#7 Pride kills a marriage.

Not being able to admit you're wrong; thinking you are always right; my will, not God's will be done.

gee-en
Salt Lake City, UT

well thought out article and beautiful advice, thank you!

Ranch
Here, UT

Nice. Now how about letting the rest of us take a stab at it?

Baccus0902
Leesburg, VA

A beautiful narrative and yet down to earth approach to marriage.

Mrs. Loosli's article is a mirror of her marriage, indicates how her marriage and most marriages is the union of two individuals who unite their lives and have to learn together how to make this relationship and association work. Marriage according to this article is an ever evolving process of learning and discovery.

The six important advices and the description per se of what is a marriage, transcend gender, sexuality, and a series of other appendixes that the State of Utah is adding of late. Marriage remains what traditionally has been, the union of two people who care for each other and who are willing to work together and give 100% (each) of their abilities to provide for emotional, physical and spiritual safety and growths for the couple.

RDLV
Costa Rica, 00

Back in the covered wagon days, when I was a young and single undergraduate student, Dr. Harold Bissell of the BYU Geology Department was explaining to we know-it-alls about marriage. He told us that the secret to a strong and long lasting marriage is all in decision making. He said that he always made the big and important family and personal decisions but it was important to let his wife make some of the small ones, just to make her feel good. He allowed his wife to decide those little things like: "where we live, who our friends are, what we eat, what I wear, what kind of car I drive, where I work, etc". (Just the little things.)
"l would make the major decisions, the really important stuff like: whether or not the US should get out of the UN or was there another shooter in Dallas that day".
Maybe Doc Bissell was right after all.

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