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Comments about ‘High court case: abortion clinic protest-free zone’

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Published: Monday, Jan. 13 2014 12:22 p.m. MST

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Furry1993
Ogden, UT

The buffer zone is good law. The patients to the clinic are free from harassment while the protestors can still convey their message (albeing not dcirectly, at spitting distance, into the face of the patients). It also protects the safety of the patients and practitioners are the medical clinics.

If people don't like the law, I ask them to describe how best to protect the patients from over-zealous protestors while allowing the protestors to convey their mesage.

OHBU
Columbus, OH

What I find most insulting is that these protesters seem to think that these women haven't given it five minutes of thought. You would be hard-pressed to find an actual woman who takes abortion lightly, despite the stereotype of the abortion junky, ghetto mom thrown around on conservative media. The women entering these clinics have likely investigated their options, considered it, often cried about it, and come to a tough decision. They don't need someone getting in their face telling them they're a bad person as they try to go through the doors.

Bag Man
POWDER SPRINGS, GA

I wonder if the 35 ft zone was around the entrances of a Church, Mosaic, Temple, religious gathering or some other non liberal agenda item, if there would be the same support on the part of the those who currently support this zone.

If it doesn't for one thing why should it work for the other way.

As always, it seems to be good only if it fits what the people support, but if it goes against what they think, then it is bad.

UTSU
Logan, UT

buffer zone is not just for abortion. many conservative states have buffer zone to prevent Westboro Baptist Church to picket military service men and women's funeral face to face.

If this MA law is struck down, I wonder if the next thing will be Westboro Baptist Church can picket a soldier's funeral standing next to his family members.

UTSU
Logan, UT

@Bag Man,

If there are some people constantly standing at a church's door, telling church members they are murderers, then yes, there should be a buffer zone for those people.

J-TX
Allen, TX

Wpould be nice if there were a 35-foot buffer zone around all entrances to Temple Square, so those abusive protesters could be held at bay.

But that's different free speech, isn't it? Only the Left get to express themselves in our PC world.....

samhill
Salt Lake City, UT

To "OHBU" from Ohio who writes, "The women entering these clinics have likely investigated their options, considered it, often cried about it, and come to a tough decision.", I have a question.

Why would these women, or anyone else, consider this a "tough decision"?

If the act of abortion is no more consequential than having a haircut, as many abortion advocates I've read or heard from state, then why would deciding to have a haircut, or not, be so tough?

Could it be that most people, women in particular, have a hard time deciding to have an abortion because, in fact, the consequences are **vastly** more important than having a haircut. That, in fact, at least one life, their child's life, hang's in the balance.

Most people adopt these lies because they find the truth of what abortion means to be so difficult to accept. Consequently, I'm convinced that when the lies forming the basis of the pro-abortion arguments are fully and honestly confronted, especially by the one making the argument, the decision to kill an unborn child is not only made tougher, but less likely to result in the death of the child.

Schnee
Salt Lake City, UT

@Bag Man
"I wonder if the 35 ft zone was around the entrances of a Church, Mosaic, Temple, religious gathering or some other non liberal agenda item, if there would be the same support on the part of the those who currently support this zone. "

Not sure why religious buildings are "non liberal agenda" when over half of liberals are religious but whatever. Sure. 35ft isn't that far away.

Luke Nelson
West Valley City, UT

@Bag Man

I support the right of protestors to gather on Temple Square every April and October. I don't appreciate their message, but I support their right to free speech.

OHBU
Columbus, OH

I have never heard a single serious pro-choice advocate say it's like getting a haircut...that's only the stereotype of these women promoted by conservative opponents. In reality people take these decisions seriously, just as they do when considering getting a mastectomy or otherwise undergoing medical procedures. If you bring the child to term there are far-reaching consequences, even if the child is immediately given up for adoption. It's a tough choice, but I believe a women has the right to make those decisions about her body, and the government does not.

MrPlate
Lindon, UT

@OHBU - NARAL, a serious pro-choice advocate, made a video comparing abortion to many daily banal choices of women, like chewing gum, buying sweaters, and yes, getting haircuts. In reality, "most" people probably take these decisions seriously, as with other medical procedures. Unfortunately, pro-choice leaders want to brainwash women into thinking abortion is just one of many casual choices they might make, without consequence and easily forgotten as a common and trivial occurrence.

I think it takes a high degree of denial and callousness to conveniently pretend an abortion is only about the body of a woman, and has no connection to the body of the human life being killed. Why stop at birth? Babies can be tremendously inconvenient to the "body of a woman" for some time even after birth. Why not extend her right to decisions about her body (and by extension, whatever affects her body) for a year after the birth of her child, as long as the body of the child is not to be considered? I believe the government certainly does have a right to make decisions about the lives of human beings.

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