Comments about ‘More Republicans — including Utah's Jason Chaffetz — talking pathway to citizenship’

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Published: Tuesday, Sept. 3 2013 6:49 a.m. MDT

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SLars
Provo, UT

Right now people who are here illegally face a 10 year ban if deported. I can see lifting that ban for 6 months, and have the people return to their homeland. Then they could apply, and stand in line like the rest of honest people, with no 10 year ban.

It would require returning to immediate family sponsorship, instead of the extended sponsorship that we have now. Extended families create long lines, and keep many out that have no relatives here.

Business would not get amnesty either. They would have to pay for their illegal workers relocation costs.

Punishment with humanity, it does not compensate Americans for id theft, and social security fraud.

This along with border enforcement, e-verify, interior enforcement would solve the problem. Congress should be put in charge of enforcement to make it happen.

Amnesty begets amnesty, only enforcement will stop it.

Say No to BO
Mapleton, UT

Let's say we have a problem...like speeding in a school zone.
Would you accept the decision of your police department to give speeders coupons for free donuts rather than a ticket as a way to address the problem?
Of course not. Deterrence comes about when you ENFORCE the law, not reward illegal behavior.
At this time in our country ONE THIRD of all foreign-born are here illegally. Taken together with those who have received some form of amnesty, that number grows to HALF.
Thomas Sowell said: Let's go back to square one. The purpose of American immigration laws and policies is not to be either humane or inhumane to illegal immigrants. The purpose of immigration laws and policies is to serve the national interest of this country. There is no inherent right to come live in the United States, in disregard of whether the American people want you here. Nor does the passage of time confer any such right retroactively. (end quote)

Let's get back to enforcement rather than pandering to segments of the population!

Jack
Aurora, CO

Let's be practical here. We cannot round up and deport 11 million undocumented aliens, so let's stop thinking that deportation will solve the matter. Not enough space for detention, not enough courts to handle the load. The end state we all want is legal immigration, but we don't want amnesty. So, the solution is far from clear. There has to be a way to penalize the illegals, get those who do it right to the front of the line, and secure the border so this dike doesn't keep leaking. It will take statesmanship, leadership and vision. So who wants to step up and be the one to solve this mess? Someone with no political aspirations as they most likely will burn lots of bridges, someone who isn't beholden to one special interest or another, and someone who can actually lead through the fog.

Any ideas?

NeilT
Clearfield, UT

Jack well said. Both sides are going to have give a little and meet somewhere in the middle. It appears we are starting to make a degree of progress in that direction. Statesmanship has become a rarity in today's polarized and partisan political environment.

JayTee
Sandy, UT

A special "pathway to citizenship" for invaders would be like giving a special pathway to wealth for those who rob banks and embezzle money. Those jumping though all the hoops to do it right and follow the law should be the ones, if any, who get preferential treatment, while those who ignore the law and demand everything should be convinced that we're not a nation of pushover enablers. Or are we?

Neanderthal
Pheonix, AZ

@Jack:
"We cannot round up and deport 11 million undocumented aliens, so let's stop thinking that deportation will solve the matter."

They don't have to be rounded up. All that is needed is to enforce E-Verify and most, if not all will deport themselves. Not only that, they will stop coming. No jobs, no draw to come here.

"There has to be a way to penalize the illegals, get those who do it right to the front of the line, and secure the border so this dike doesn't keep leaking."

Securing the border solves only about half of the problem. The rest are visa overstays.

"It will take statesmanship, leadership and vision."

Do nothing except... enforce E-Verify. Also, don't allow such as drivers licenses and social benefits such as medicaid. Raise the income tax rate to fifty percent for illegals. In other words, do what Mexico does to their illegal immigrants.

"Any ideas?"

Yes. See above.

LDS Liberal
Farmington, UT

Looks like the "cheap labor force" lobby groups final gave Jason a campaign contribution ($) check big enough to change his mind...

LDS Liberal
Farmington, UT

@Neanderthal
Pheonix, AZ

All that is needed is to enforce E-Verify and most, if not all will deport themselves. Not only that, they will stop coming. No jobs, no draw to come here.

[You realize that e-Verify targets the businesses who hire them, don't you?
BTW - e-verify is something THIS liberal has pushed for a long, long time now.]

Do nothing except... enforce E-Verify. Also, don't allow such as drivers licenses and social benefits such as medicaid.
[Driver's license for illegals is a STATE'S inititive, don't like - call you state rep.]

Raise the income tax rate to fifty percent for illegals.
[Raise it 100%, 500%, 1,000% - It doesn't matter.
Businesses pay illegals cash under the table so there isn't a money trail to audit -- that's why neither the business NOR the illegals pay any taxes.]

"Any ideas?"

Yes. See above.
11:24 p.m. Sept. 2, 2013

[Except for e-Verify -- Your ideas are full of holes.]

Say No to BO
Mapleton, UT

@Jack
I will tell you what will NOT work; preachers, police chiefs and politicians lining up as apologists for illegal aliens.
The likelihood of an illegal alien receiving any resistance at all is near zero. No pushback. None.
Despite all the laws on the books no one is enforcing them. That has grown worse with Obama. No worksite raids. No SSN No-Match letters. No local enforcement agreements.
In fact, just the opposite. About 300,000 people who had previously been through the immigration courts and ordered to be deported suddenly got an Obama reprieve.
Don't tell me enforcement doesn't work until we try it.
If we get serious and deport the first two million just because they are unlawfully present the rest will go home.
The problem we have now is that crime pays.

TMR
Los Angeles, CA

It is nice to see Chaffetz finally showing some humanity and compassion. I hope others in the Republican party will follow suit. On civil rights and social/moral issues, the GOP is slow to move, but after a lot of painful pouting, the party eventually moves in the right direction. I also hope the wisdom of the straight approach will prevail. These immigrants do not need to be punished. Rather, they need to be integrated and the sooner the better.

Lermentov
PROVO, UT

I hope Chaffetz has changed his tune since his first campaign suggestedd the illegals go into camps.

Four myths of illegal immigration:

Myth #1 Illegal immigrations steal jobs.
In 1980 Fidel Castro made the surprise announcement that anybody who wanted to leave Cuba could do so; as a result more than 125,000 Cubans swamped the Miami labor market What was the result? Nothing. No increase in unemployment.

Myth #2 Previous immigrants worked hard to become American, whereas Mexicans refuse to assimilate or even
learn English.
Actually the rates of English learning for Mexican immigrants are comparable to the rates found in the immigrant communities of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Myth #3: Previous immigrants were not illegal, making them more legitimate. The very concept of legality of immigrants is new. The first nonspecific immigration restrictions of the kind we use today were not in place until the mid-20th century.

Myth #4: Liberalizing immigration laws would trigger a flood of immigrants.
Late 20th-century attempts to make border crossings more difficult for illegal immigrants led to more staying in the United States instead of going back home. They did not want to risk not getting back in.

SG in SLC
Salt Lake City, UT

I tend to be sympathetic to the plight of illegal immigrants in general, many of whom are here illegally as an act of desperation in an attempt to provide for their families, and I tend to favor illegal immigration solutions that are compassionate and not punitive for the sake of being punitive . . . but I take issue with the concept of a "pathway to citizenship" as part of the solution. I don't think that is what is needed, and in many cases, it isn't what is wanted. What I think we should really be talking about is a "pathway to legally-documented status". There should be a formal acknowledgement on the part of the illegal immigrant that they have violated immigration law (a signed affidavit and a "flag" on their government records), and there should probably be a probation requirement associated with that acknowledgement, but there should also be a reasonable process whereby they can seek and receive legal documented status. Citizenship should be a separate process, one which these individuals can apply for on equal standing with other applicants -- once they have gained (or regained) legal documented status.

DN Subscriber 2
SLC, UT

We have a path to citizenship. Obey the law and come here legally.

Anything else just rewards criminal acts.

Only a fool would advocate giving bank robbers a 50% bonus for robbing the bank, but that is exactly what we are doing by pushing any sort of amnesty scheme under whatever euphemism it might be sold.

Enforce the laws, all of them, or we will see that none of our laws will be obeyed by anyone.

Elcapitan
Ivins, UT

the US has been lax on border enforcement for years as well as emigrants overstaying their passes so we are part of the problem.

Illegals generally do not have the money or time to go back home, wait, etc. etc. this is a major upset in their lives even iv you could sort them all out. Forget it.

A pathway to law abiding, contributing illegals should be established without the impossible requirement that they break up their families, leave the country etc. etc. Put yourselves in their place and see if the shoe fits for you under the circumstances. But, lets close and fence the border first.

Irony Guy
Bountiful, Utah

Headline of the day: Chaffetz Moves Gradually Toward Reality

Twin Lights
Louisville, KY

I know a few folks here illegally. Hard working, good families with older kids not born here but who do not remember their home country and younger kids who were born here and are citizens.

Unless we want to create a permanent underclass (with all the criminal negatives that implies) we need to bring those older kids fully into the American system as the Dream Act proposes.

The parents? Perhaps we forgo the discussion on citizenship for them for now and just concentrate on a legal means to a permanent residency. But we need to bring them all "above the table".

We may not want to admit it, but our country invited them here with a wink and a nod. We effectively said "don't cross the border but, if you do, I have a job for you". We did this over several administrations. Many of the families here have been here for decades.

Let them pay the penalties and fines. Let them wait a bit for citizenship (the adults). Whatever. But let's be realistic on how to proceed.

one vote
Salt Lake City, UT

Tea party needs to go berserk on him too.

SLars
Provo, UT

Americans who have paid thousands of dollors to clear their name over ID theft, need to be paid back before any action is taken. Business needs to be fined before any action is taken.

The only reason we hear cries for compassion, for breaking immigration laws, over other forms of criminal behavior, is the supply of cheap labor.

Deporting 12 million, according to a government study done in 2007 by the Immigrations and Customs Enforcement agency put the cost at 94 billion. This is a one time cost, that does not include self deportation. The Federation for American Immigration Reform puts the cost of illegal immigration at $113 billion per year. When you add in the boost to our economy from putting millions of Americans back to work in non agriculture jobs, we can't afford not to.

Esquire
Springville, UT

Uh, how were your ancestors penalized for coming here?

VickieB
SLC, UT

Most of my family came here legally through Ellis Island. They were issued permission to disembark certificates from the U.S. Government before they were allowed to board a ship to come here. If they did not have the certificate, they could not get off the ship, and the captain was responsibile for their return.

Before 1965 we averaged 500,000 people coming here legally each year, compare that to over a million a year now. (legally). These people had to make it on their own, and if they couldn't, they returned home. Before 1965 i/3 of those who came here legally returned to their country.

The rest of my family came from Mexico legally. Only the immediate family was allowed then, there was no expended familys to create long lines and plug up the system.

Breaking the law always takes a chunk of time out of peoples lives to make things right. If we don't deport them, we will have the same problem in the future.

Business, government and pro-illegal organizations need to clean up their act. Under our current laws businessment have committed millions of felonies, and it needs to stop.

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