Comments about ‘In our opinion: Test scores’

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Published: Wednesday, Aug. 14 2013 12:00 a.m. MDT

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2 bits
Cottonwood Heights, UT

If there's one thing I've learned in life.... it's that it makes no sense to have a standard if you don't measure to see if you meet the standard. So yes... we should be measuring. And that probably involves testing students, and student reviews of the teachers, the course material, the school, and it's administration.

I don't know if CC is what every student in every State needs. I'm not an education expert. And I have a philosophical issue with government controlling the education our kids get (it's the libertarian in me).

But if we are going to adopt CC in Utah I have 2 concerns:
1. We need to be testing to prove that we meet the standard.
2. But I don't want teachers just "teaching to the test" instead of giving our kids a well rounded education in the real skills everybody needs to succeed in life (not just in academia).

Some kids will go from high school to the work force. They need the skills to succeed in real life (not just academic skills).

RedShirt
USS Enterprise, UT

If this follows history, the tests will be changed to allow greater passing rates.

Dr S
Purcellville, VA

One important aspect of mental measurement that the general public typically does not understand is that there is no natural zero, rather the best we can do is measure from the average (mean). I have personally tested two (very disabled) children that had IQ scores of -17 and -36 when I was a grad student at USU.

The problem of using the average is the average naturally moves (varies) across sample and across time. Thus, it is very difficult to come to a valid conclusion regarding performance whenever testing instrument has changed, or when measuring one cohort to the next, or comparing one group to another. Thus, making test scores an political issue seems a bit futile to me.

worf
Mcallen, TX

@RedShirt:

Are you suggesting the SAT tests are watered down from what it was in the 1950s, 60s,or 70's?

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