Comments about ‘Former collegiate athletes pursue class action lawsuit against NCAA’

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Published: Thursday, June 20 2013 4:00 p.m. MDT

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Salt Lake City, UT

Maybe we could do away with all athletic grants in aid aka "scholarships", let students admitted to the universities and colleges as students who meed the academic requirements play in whatever sport programs they and the universities want to organized either inter-mural or between schools.

Private organizations like NFL, NBA, MLB, etc. organize developmental leagues or farm teams and stop academic institutions from being de facto farm and developmental leagues for the professional sports industry. Wages or remuneration can be worked out via player organizations or however they want to do it.

Some athletes really don't care about academics, waste time and space that could be devoted to students.

Oh, then tell the NCAA to get lost. It's all for the love of the game isn't it?

DN Subscriber 2

What a bunch of horsehockey!

College athletes (especially those in the pampered football and basketball programs) are a joke if that is their priority.

College athletics should be strictly "for fun" by "student athletes" who get no better or worse treatment or benefits from the nerds majoring in the hard courses. No scholarships for throwing or catching balls, or special living accommodations, or special tutors or other scams to keep players grades at the minimum level to be eligible.

How about a counter-suit against all these pampered athletes on behalf of the "real students" denied acceptance to benefit a big sports program? And, charge the greedy athletes megabucks for profiting from use of the school colors and logos which burnish their self proclaimed success. If it were not for the school, or rest of the team, most of these athletes would be making minimum wage somewhere today.

Fitness Freak
Salt Lake City, UT

Isn't it about time we took the big money out of college sports?

Make the rules such that no player gets a car, luxury housing, etc., when they attend a particular college. He gets a scholarship and absolutely NOTHING else. No "tutoring", no free passes, zilch. All revenue generated by games gets split between the schools. The schools get to determine who they will play. ALL revenue returned to the schools for academic expenditures.

Just because we've done what we're doing for 100 yrs. doesn't mean its the best way. Think how far the revenue from games (and televised games)could go to help academics rather than have football, basketball revenue be continually used to build newer and bigger stadiums.

Athletes SHOULD be choosing their college based on the academic programs offered, not for the "perks".

Quiet Neighborhood, UT

I don't think I am for going down the road of paying student athletes at universities. I guess this would potentially open the door for high school and middle school athletes to take their schools to small claims court suing for ticket sales of their respective games.

Johnny Moser
Thayne, WY

A little surprised at the comments content. Athletics brings money into the Universities and it builds a community of support that goes beyond the moments in life where we are actually attending the University. I have lived in China and have a few memorabilia items from my university in my office and on my desk. My Chinese colleagues wonder why I have them because they do not feel anything towards their university (China doesn't "waste" time or money on sports at any level within the "normal" universities). They would never, never, consider sending any money back to their university; why would you send them money I don't owe them anything.
The NCAA is a racket that is inherently unfair to the affiliated universities. It is unfair to the athletes. It is probably a necessary evil in that it keeps the "cheats" from abusing the process in most cases. It punishes those it catches. Should it be honest about its monetary abuse of the athletes and the billions it is making from their image and related marketing? Of course!
Should the athletes be paid for participation? NO! Should the universities get their share of NCAA monies? YES!


@Fitness Freak - Under NCAA rules, they better not be living in luxury apartments and driving nice cars. Those days are long gone, and many an athletic department has been penalized by the NCAA for their athletes getting far less benefits than that.

Now, the NCAA controls everything financial about an athlete's life. They can't even get many normal jobs or earn a living. Unless their parents were already pretty wealthy before the athlete developed his or her prowess, there better not be an increase of financial status for any family member during the athlete's college days. If they're entrepreneurial, they better not benefit financially from any business they might think of. The NCAA is a highly fascist organization.

I'm not for the athletes gaining financially from the sports for which they receive scholarships (during college), but the NCAA should be sued, and sued heavily, for their unreasonable reach into the other areas of the athletes' lives.

Orem, UT

Could this be the end of the NCAA as we know it?

What other organization could get away with forcing participants to sign away the rights to their own image in perpetuity without just compensation?

Ernest T. Bass
Bountiful, UT

Take a look at what the NCAA profits from. They fined Penn State $60M for the abuse scandal. How on earth does the NCAA believe they are due any money out of that, let alone $60M?
The NCAA is profiting from what happened to those poor kids. I can't see how they think they have any jurisdiction on that.

newhall, CA

Good! Finally! I hope this cripples the NCAA or eliminates this pariah. The NCAA has abused its position and monetarily gained exponentially off of the backs of student athletes. It's time to dismantle this corrupt organization. There should no longer be student athletes. They should be paid period.

Salt Lake City, UT

Just let it go.....

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