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Comments about ‘Officials: NSA programs broke terrorist plots in United States, 20 nations’

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Published: Sunday, June 16 2013 12:08 a.m. MDT

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Mainly Me
Werribee, 00

"...fewer than 300 phone numbers were checked against the database of millions of U.S. phone records...."

Anyone really believe this line?

worf
Mcallen, TX

NSA programs did not prevent the Boston marathon bombing, guns to Mexican cartels, Benghazi, or the Fort Hood shooting.

Another waste of public money, and decline of American freedoms.

Claudio
Springville, Ut

Re: Worf

And the firefighters didn't prevent a fire in Colorado Springs. The police didn't prevent the thousands of robberies that took place this week either. I guess those are wastes of public money too. Better get rid of them.

After all, anarchy works swell. Just ask the folks in Syria, Somalia, Yemen, Afghanistan...

Orem Parent
Orem, UT

Check them all. EVERYBODY. I've got nothing to hide. Keep up the good work.

dumprake
Washington, UT

I don't know whether this is true or not, whether terrorist plots were foiled or not. But why should Americans be expected to believe a president who has lied consistently for nearly five years. The most dishonest presidency in American history expects this people to believe a proven liar? Until we see a consistent pattern of honest and "transparency" from the president, the press shouldn't even bother to report on what he says.

Say No to BO
Mapleton, UT

@Mainly Me
Of course it's a lie. The AP phone records scandal added up to far more than 300.
These guys are in the spy business. They lie for a living.
What they don't tell you is how much spying they did on their political enemies.
It's just another boot pressed against our faces.

Moabmom
Moab, UT

If you're gullible enough to by the "Peace thru surveillance" line, I've got some beach front property for sale in Thompson....

Hutterite
American Fork, UT

This issue needs a lot of thoughtful discussion, not only because of what it does to our freedom but what it provides for our security. Demanding it be dismantled because you've learned to spell 'benghazi' is not this discussion. Whatever the outcome, given the level of discourse on this subject and government in general, I fear it will be the wrong one.

There You Go Again
Saint George, UT

"...I don't know whether this is true or not...".

Mitt Romney the twice failed Presidential Candidate/Nominee's favorite VP of all time Dick Cheney told Americans on FOX news(?) this morning, "...this..." is, was, will be true.

And we all know that Dick Cheney would never lie!

worf
Mcallen, TX

Claudio:

So, in a free country, you think it's ok for a government to spy on its people? A government which has created a seventeen trillion dollar debt. That's $580,000 for every second in a year, and enough to make millionaires of all families in the country. You trust these guys to spy on your family? I don't understand you. Why?

The IRS has just proven that spying on people brings unwanted consequences.

worf
Mcallen, TX

I could list many lies stemming political leaders, and the media. Some examples:

* The violence in Benghazi was not because of terrorists, but because of a video.
* Mitt Romney paid no federal incomes taxes for ten straight years.
* Hillary Clinton was under fire in Bosnia, and her daughter was jogging by the world trade center when it blew up.
* Toyotas will accelerate without warning
* Obama Care will reduce the deficit, insurance premiums, etc.

How do we know of broken terrorist plots, and are we spying on people in 20 other nations as well? Can we trust the words coming from the press? Lying breeds more lying.

Now we trust ourselves to be spied on for the sake of safety? Where does this trust come from?

Riverton Cougar
Riverton, UT

This is coming from the most dishonest administration in the history of the United States. I'll feel much better about our government once Obama and his administration are out of the White House.

Claudio
Springville, Ut

Worf,

There you go putting words in my mouth again. I didn't say any of that. In fact, I'm on record in these comment boards being against it. Feel free to continue to spin things the way you want. I already know facts don't trouble you. Have a great day!

worf
Mcallen, TX

Claudio:

In a sarcastic way,-you were defending NSA programs. Look at your comment.

Tators
Hyrum, UT

Worf:

Do you have any vague idea what the difference is between an agency spying on it's citizens and one that is monitoring international communications, looking for keywords like bomb, terrorist, etc.? From your comments, it's rather obvious you don't. This program with the NSA is the latter. It's monitoring only specific, targeted communications that could pose a threat. The vast majority are immediately discarded and not retained.

Law enforcement agencies have quietly and unobtrusively been using surveillance techniques for generations to stop crime and helping to preserve our level of national freedom, not negate it.

Terrorism is a crime that people should be willing to give up a very small amount of privacy to help contain. Has it stopped all bad activities? Of course not. Nothing can do that. Has it stopped multiple documented terrorist plots? Yes, it actually has. And for that we should be grateful and get off of our high-horses.

Exactly where in the Constitution is this surveillance program specifically outlawed or forbidden? What specific negative consequences have you personally or any other law abiding citizen suffered from it? It seems there is a lot of unnecessary paranoia going around.

Joan Watson
TWIN FALLS, ID

As one who has worked in the administrative office of a telephone company- the reason that wire taps were used on a specific telephone was for probable cause as specified by the police department. Taps were restricted by time as mandated by the telephone company.

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