Quantcast

Comments about ‘Record Big 12 and SEC conference revenue expected to keep climbing’

Return to article »

Published: Friday, May 31 2013 7:16 p.m. MDT

Comments
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
NorCalCougarFan&Alum
Elk Grove, CA

Wow! With those types of payouts, the SEC and Big 12 will have some huge advantages in many fronts in comparison to the rest. Money buys a lot of things, including recruits and facilities. It'll be interesting to see how many Big 12 and SEC teams quality for the 4-team playoffs year after year with such a huge bankroll.

Mildred in Fillmore
Salt Lake City, UT

But they don't have our HD truck and broadcast partner.

Big 12 Bob
Salt Lake City, UT

Seriously. We're happy with 10 members. Leave us alone.

MacNasty
Rexburg, ID

Re: Big 12 Bob

The one problem the Big 12 has is that is only has 10 teams. It needs at least 12 to have a championship game (ie. SEC).

My understanding is that the Big 12 is asking the NCAA to waive the requirement so that it can have a championship game.

If the NCAA does not budge, then you may see two more teams added. If the waiver is granted, you will see a lot of upset people; especially in the PAC12.

DEW Cougars
Sandy, UT

@Mildred in Fillmore

"But they don't have our HD truck and broadcast partner."

Not yet but they will catch up some day.

Cougsndawgs
West Point , UT

My question is why doesn't BYU and Cincinnati apply for Big 12 membership and work the contract money so that they only receive the INCREASE of the renegotiated TV package including them? In other words Big 12 schools make 20 mil per school right now with their 1st and 2nd tier rights (200 million per yr to the conference). Say BYU and Cincinnati are accepted and that is pushed to 220 million a year, but BYU and Cincinnati only share the additional 20 mil, thus not taking any money from the schools already in the current contract. This would also provide more money to the Big 12 because then they could have a championship game and probably at least one more bowl tie in. BYU has plenty of money so that's never been an issue for them (like it is for other schools like Utah), and 10-12 mil would still be more than they're making now, same for Cincinnati. Why couldn't this be done? Both parties would benefit. Anyone who understands TV deals, explain why this could or couldn't happen?

Howard S.
Taylorsville, UT

@Cougsndawgs

Couldn't happen because the Big12 already is at it's capacity for prima donna institutions.

Cougsndawgs
West Point , UT

@Howie
Any REAL reasons other than those made up by BYU haters? The big 12 would be stupid not to do this. They would make more money, have more stability with 12 teams (and two decent programs with quality athletic programs). BYU and cincy would make more money also so it seems a win win situation if there were no clauses or exemptions in the network contracts.

NorCalCougarFan&Alum
Elk Grove, CA

I think people need to get it out of their minds the idea of BYU joining a conference for football. The Cougars will stay independent in football as long as the payout from ESPN continues, which brings about the exposure desired by the university's board of trustees. Also, independence will stay in place as long as BYU can put together a competitive schedule and bowl options staycontinue to be available. Finally, we need to accept the limitations in recruiting and the university standards that affect the latter, which come with the territory of being a Cougar fan. It is what it is! GO COUGARS!

Wookie
Omaha, NE

@Cougsndawgs

You allude that BYU has ample money? Where are you inferring this money comes from? Also, DNews published an article a short while ago where it had indicated the amount of revenue generated by each school. Utah was the top grossing University in the state as far as athletics are considered. I hope you are not alluding that the LDS Church will use its funds to bail-out their athletic programs if needed, if so I think your theory will unfortunately be tested one day.

I think BYU has done a great job in its independence. I am proud of what they have accomplished thus far and continue to accomplish. I hope that they become wildly successful and prove naysayers wrong. I also hope that Utah continues to thrive in the PAC-12 and also better itself therein.

The only negative from all of this is that this money could be used for a greater purpose.

GO UTES!!

Cougsndawgs
West Point , UT

Wookie:
I absolutely agree that money could be used for bigger and better causes than sports. As for where BYU athletics gets all their money from, that is a matter of debate and speculation since those PL reports aren't made public. However, when looking at the superior athletic facilities (Holmoe has even alluded to a new basketball practice facility in the plans) at BYU for track, football, volleyball etc that money had to come from somewhere. I hope as you do that it is coming from wealthy boosters but I think that would be a stretch. BYU just built a 100 plus million broadcast center and HD truck, and while that's also being used for BYUtv, I'm guessing a large part of that budget is for athletics. BYU has obviously not needed conference money to do all this, since most of it has been done while in the MWC and WAC with minuscule tv money. It's obvious Utah makes the most directly from athletics, but that's due to the PAC12 TV deals, and Utah HAS to make that money, whereas BYU has shown they aren't as dependent on conference money.

Duckhunter
Highland, UT

@wookie

BYU has ample funds and no we do not know all the details. We do know that they run a multi million dollar surplus as it has been reported in both local dailies. We know they are self supporting as that is their mandate so your fears that they may get some money from their owner, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, can be put to rest although if the powers that be in SLC decided to pour some money into the programs there then who are you to question them for doing so?

The most heavily subsidized program around here is on the bench in east salt lake. It runs in the red and must take money from student fees and the school itself to even operate. Despite its much bragged about pac 12 millions it is still far, far, far behind its big brother to the south in facilities and other marks of a well run athletic program. The subsidies don't appear to be ending anytime soon either.

SLC BYU Fan
Salt Lake City, UT

The biggest problems for the Big 12 is they are presently stuck at 10 schools, with strong opposition from Texas to go to 12 and host a CCG the first weekend in December. The other schools including Oklahoma aren't buying it so their commissioner, Bob Bowlsby has threatened to take a petition forward, but is likely to fall on deaf ears. BYU eventually going to the Big 12 is still a strong possability since they're the only non-ACC team that would be revenue neautral if they had to renegotiate their 1st & 2nd tier rights with ESPN/ABC & FOX due to expansion. The ACC just signed a similar grant of rights which will all but preclude any defections from there (Florida State, Clemson etc...). So it comes down to BYU and an MWC school since all the remaining American Athletic Conference (used to be Big East) schools fail to meet the criteria established by the networks. Boise State will be free to leave the MWC in 2016, and like BYU (1994, 2011), New Mexico represents a school the Big 12 has negotiated with before (1994).

Duckhunter
Highland, UT

@wookie

BYU has ample funds and no we do not know all the details. We do know that they run a multi million dollar surplus as it has been reported in both local dailies. We know they are self supporting as that is their mandate so your fears that they may get some money from their owner, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, can be put to rest although if the powers that be in SLC decided to pour some money into the programs there then who are you to question them for doing so?

The most heavily subsidized program around here is on the bench in east salt lake. It runs in the red and must take money from student fees and the school itself to even operate. Despite its much bragged about pac 12 millions it is still far, far, far behind its big brother to the south in facilities and other marks of a well run athletic program. The subsidies don't appear to be ending anytime soon either.

Naval Vet
Philadelphia, PA

Cougsndawgs:

"My question is why doesn't BYU and Cincinnati apply for Big 12 membership and work the contract money so that they only receive the INCREASE of the renegotiated TV package including them?....Why couldn't this be done?"

The answer is because the Big 12 doesn't WANT the Indy-WACers. They're too midmajorey to for that elite conference. I thought you knew that by now. However, that proposal MIGHT work for a school like the 2-time BCS bowl busting Broncos of Boise St. They should definitely look into it. They might even find a friend in TCU to vouch for them. Too bad the Indy-WACers never learned how to make friends, but rather wrote the book on burnt bridges.

Best you get used this: You're midmajors forever.

Big 12 Bob
Salt Lake City, UT

Cougsndawgs wonders "why this could or couldn't happen?"
Step One is "sign over television rights to the Big 12 Conference". Are they ready to do that?

That means if BYU joined the Big 12 as "an experiment", and after a couple of years changed their mind, their television rights would remain with the Big 12 (I think its 6 years). So the money for a nationally televised BYU-Notre Dame game would go to the Big 12 Conference. You say BYU is flush with money, so maybe that's not a big deal, but still. Zero dollars coming in from television? Ouch.

Cougsndawgs
West Point , UT

Naval Vet:
None of your BYU hating biased comments even deserve rebuttal because they hardly reflect truth (Big 12 wanted BYU, BYU walked away from THEM), or any realistic understanding of realignment/expansion factors (Boise St resides in a 130ish ranked market with half BYUs fanbase). But alas i rebutted anyway because for some reason I think theres hope for you. Try being less biased and such a hater and you might actually learn something about BYU. I certainly have learned lots of great things about the university of Utah because I chose to be unbiased and truthful in my investigations. Try doing the same and then maybe people will take your opinion more seriously.

Naval Vet
Philadelphia, PA

Cougsndawgs:

"Big 12 wanted BYU, BYU walked away from THEM."

Nope. Never happened. You made that up. The Big 12 "looked" at the Indy-WACers, but opted to go in a different direction (i.e. TCU, WVU). You were WAC-ish; TCU/WVU were not. It's no surprise which of the 3 DIDN'T get the invite, and are now left to play with themselves...and Middle Tennessee. Nice Home-&-Home you got there [*snicker*].

SoonerUte
Salt Lake City, UT

"Big 12 wanted BYU, BYU walked away from THEM."
Tweet by Tom Holmoe on February 19, 2013 "Listen carefully- There...has...been...no...offer, thus we strive for great success as independent in football."
Comments by Tom Holmoe in October 2011 "First, were we invited to the Big 12? No, we have not been invited."

However, I would support you comment that "BYU walked away from THEM (the Big 12)". At that time, the Big 12 was looking for teams to help them weather realignment. One can't blame BYU for deciding that independence looked better than a struggling Big 12. But now that the Big 12 is solid, one can't blame the Big 12 for passing on BYU in future expansions. BYU didn't want to help out when they were needed in tough times; why should they be rewarded with membership in good times?

Cougsndawgs
West Point , UT

Naval Vet:
"Nope. Never happened. You made that up. The Big 12 "looked" at the Indy-WACers, but opted to go in a different direction (i.e. TCU, WVU). You were WAC-ish; TCU/WVU were not."

Chip Brown: "BYU officials were turned off by the instability and backed away, saying it cherished its independence. BYU turned away from the Big 12 first. So that was a downfall."

I made that up? It "never happened"? Try again. You got frantic didn't you? Fail.

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments