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Comments about ‘What others say: Look in the mirror’

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Published: Thursday, May 30 2013 12:00 a.m. MDT

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Zac
Ogden, UT

FINALLY, FINALLY, FINALLY...An editorial that isn't playing one of the Democrat's favorite games, class envy. It has been proven that Apple, GE, Koch Bros, Romney, etc, have not evaded taxes. They follow and use any tax laws (not loopholes) they can benefit from. And, it is completely legal, ethical, moral, good business practice, whatever.

You can try to place blame on the "evil" corporations, but the facts are that politicians are the ones with the final say. The politicians are the ones that hide these laws in long bills that, you know, need to be voted on so we know what's in them (thanks Pelosi). Rand Paul was right to lecture the old politicians. That is something we need a lot more of.

It is the responsibility, obligation, and right for businesses, people, entities to pay the absolute least amount of tax that they are legally required. For those that want to throw their money away, and pay more than that...you can do that on your own. But, as the saying goes "a fool and his money are soon parted."

one old man
Ogden, UT

Congress is a disgusting mess.

Res Novae
Ashburn, VA

@Zac

"You can try to place blame on the "evil" corporations, but the facts are that politicians are the ones with the final say."

I agree with you that there's nothing wrong with taking advantage of loopholes. However, the above bothers me. Corporations lobby heavily and pour millions into the election warchests of politicians, who then give them those tax breaks. How this manages to pass an ethical smell test is beyond me.

When the line between corporate interests and political ones becomes increasingly fuzzy, I'm skeptical that there is much of a difference between corporations and politicians.

m.g. scott
clearfield, UT

Yes Res Novae, you are right about the back scratching that goes on in business and politics. After all, who do we have in government besides lawyers, businessmen. However, I for one want American business to succeed for the sake of our capitalist economy, not for the sake of our growing government. Wealth created by private sector business is much more valuable than wealth taken by the government. We could never have too much economic growth and wealth in America. That would just mean more prosperity for more people. We could however have too much government. That would mean less prosperity for more Americans paying more taxes to support the government. And that I'm afraid is the direction we are headed in. I was just looking at the debt clock today. It takes 41 seconds for our debt to grow by 1 million dollars. It takes 1 minute and 46 seconds for our taxes to add 1 million dollars to the budget. It can't go on forever like this.

JimInSLC
Salt Lake City, UT

People across the country are protesting against a giant corporation, Monsanto. And congress just put down a bill that would allow States the right to require that GMO foods be listed on the label. Both UT Senators Hatch and Lee voted against it. Most countries around the world will not allow GMO's into their country, but we can't even get our law makers to let us know what we are sold to eat. I would sure like to know why they voted against it. Campaign contributions possibly?

Truthseeker
SLO, CA

It is true that corporations spend millions lobbying members of Congress, even writing legislation which would give them favorable tax laws.

"In the 1990s, lobbying was largely reactive. Corporations had to fend off proposals that would have restricted them or cost them money. But with pro-business officials running the executive and legislative branches, companies are also hiring well-placed lobbyists to go on the offensive and find ways to profit from the many tax breaks, loosened regulations and other government goodies that increasingly are available.

The number of registered lobbyists in Washington has more than doubled since 2000 to more than 34,750 while the amount that lobbyists charge their new clients has increased by as much as 100 percent.

The lobbying boom has been caused by three factors, experts say: rapid growth in government, Republican control of both the White House and Congress, and wide acceptance among corporations that they need to hire professional lobbyists to secure their share of federal benefits.
(Washington Post "The Road to Riches" 2005)

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